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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Chancellorsville in Spotsylvania County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Chancellorsville Campaign

 
 
Chancellorsville Campaign Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
1. Chancellorsville Campaign Marker
Inscription. May 1-3, 1863. "Our enemy must either ingloriously fly or come out from behind his entrenchments and give us battle on our own ground, where certain destruction awaits him." With these words, "Fighting Joe" Hooker, on May 1, started toward the rear of Lee's Fredericksburg lines. Inspired by Hooker's enthusiasm, his confident troops swung briskly along the Turnpike. When resistance was encountered, Hooker ordered the army back to Chancellorsville. May 2, while "Stonewall" Jackson marched to attack the Union right flank, Confederates on this front threatened Hooker and on May 3, helped drive the Federals from Chancellorsville.
 
Erected by United States Department of the Interior - National Park Service.
 
Location. 38° 18.014′ N, 77° 36.858′ W. Marker is near Chancellorsville, Virginia, in Spotsylvania County. Marker is on McLaws Drive 0.1 miles south of Plank Road / Germania Highway (Virginia Highway 3), on the right when traveling south. Click for map. Located just to the north of stop four of the Chancellorsville Battle driving tour. Marker is in this post office area: Fredericksburg VA 22407, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Day at Chancellorsville (about 500 feet away, measured
Marker Beside McLaws Drive image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
2. Marker Beside McLaws Drive
in a direct line); a different marker also named First Day at Chancellorsville (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named First Day at Chancellorsville (about 700 feet away); McLaws Trail (approx. mile away); a different marker also named First Day at Chancellorsville (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named First Day at Chancellorsville (approx. half a mile away); Wounding of Jackson (approx. 0.6 miles away); a different marker also named Chancellorsville Campaign (approx. 0.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Chancellorsville.
 
Regarding Chancellorsville Campaign. Present day McLaws Drive was a part of Furnace Road, bisecting the Orange Pike and Orange Plank Road, and forming the east edge of the battle area on May 1-3, 1863. Significant tracts of the battle area remain intact. Stops along this portion of the Battlefield Driving Tour include The First Day Battlefield, McLaws's Line, Lee-Jackson Bivouac, Maury Birthplace, Sickles' Attack, and Catharine Furnace. These are linked on the Related
Trenches of McLaws Division image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
3. Trenches of McLaws Division
Across the road from the marker is a short segment of trenches built by McLaws's Division during the battle.
Markers
section below.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Virtual Tour by Markers of the East Section of the Chancellorsville Battlefield.
 
Also see . . .
1. Battle of Chancellorsville. National Parks Service site. (Submitted on November 15, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. McLaws Trail Walking Tour. Guide to the walking trail around McLaws's Line. (Submitted on November 15, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Other Chancellorsville Virtual Tours by Markers. Links to other "trail heads" for the virtual tours. (Submitted on November 17, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Driving Tour Stop Four image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
4. Driving Tour Stop Four
Just a short distance south of the marker is a segment of the battlefield where action occurred on May 1-3, 1863. The field was preserved through the efforts of the Central Virginia Battlefields Trust. There is an eight stop walking trail (without interpretive markers) around the field. Several episodes of note occurred in the bounds of this tract of the battlefield. When ordered off the high ground where this photo was taken, Federal General George G. Meade remarked, "...if we can't hold the top of the hill, we certainly can't hold the bottom of it."
General Lee Under Fire image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, November 10, 2007
5. General Lee Under Fire
Near here on May 2, 1863, Confederate General Robert E. Lee came under fire from Federal artillery. He was described as indifferent when one shell cut down a tree just a few feet above him. Later officers approached the general urging, "General, we cannot spare you, go back under the hill." And although he obliged his doting staff, he would return shortly afterwards to the front, calmly watching the fighting.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,177 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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