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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Austin in Travis County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

The LBJ Plaza

 
 
The LBJ Plaza Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 8, 2010
1. The LBJ Plaza Marker
Inscription.
The Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum was designed by Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore Owings & Merrill (SOM) and opened in the spring of 1971. The design featured the monumental library building clad in Roman travertine and an expansive plaza paved in travertine and terrazzo. On the plaza are three square fountains.

In 2009, due to significant deterioration caused by water infiltration, the plaza was rebuilt as seen today. Working closely with the Texas Historical Commission, The University of Texas and the National Archives and Records Administration replaced the existing paving materials with granite and reinterpreted the fountains as planting areas. In collaboration with the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center, native plants were selected to make the plaza more hospitable and environmentally responsible.

The plaza is now an important feature of the Lady Bird Johnson Center, a tribute to the First Lady. Mrs. Johnson is remembered as an advocate of education, the mother of the environmental movement, and a person of tremendous charm and grace. The Lady Bird Johnson Center with its redesigned plaza supports the mission of the Library as a place of education and learning, reflecting the warmth and hospitality of Mrs. Johnson and her love of our beautiful Texas landscape.

The photograph above depicts
The LBJ Plaza Marker in the shade of the breezeway at right image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 8, 2010
2. The LBJ Plaza Marker in the shade of the breezeway at right
- note the Texas Memorial Stadium in the background at left and the landmark "Texas Tower", center, right - all on the campus of the University of Texas, Austin.
the original design. A section of the original paving is preserved at the northwest quadrant of the plaza.

 
Erected 2009 by the Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum.
 
Location. 30° 17.127′ N, 97° 43.729′ W. Marker is in Austin, Texas, in Travis County. Marker can be reached from Red River Street 0.1 miles north of Clyde Littlefield Drive. Click for map. Marker is west of the LBJ Library parking area - in the breezeway of Sid Richardson Hall on the University of Texas, Austin campus. The Library is one block west of I-35/US Hwy. 290, accessible north of the exit for E. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2313 Red River Street, Austin TX 78705, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Replica of San Lorenzo Monument 1 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); University Interscholastic League (approx. 0.3 miles away); J. Frank Dobie House (approx. 0.3 miles away); Gen. George W. Terrell (approx. 0.6 miles away); Jacob Fontaine (approx. 0.6 miles away); Abner Hugh Cook (approx. 0.7 miles away); Austin Presbyterian Theological Seminary Campus (approx. 0.7 miles away); Swante Palm (approx. 0.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Austin.
 
Also see . . .
The monumental Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library at left image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, August 8, 2010
3. The monumental Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library at left
- the Plaza Marker in the breezeway of Sid Richardson Hall to the left of the flagpoles.

1. The Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum. (Submitted on September 17, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center. "The mission of the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center is to increase the sustainable use and conservation of native wildflowers, plants and landscapes." (Submitted on September 17, 2010, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 
 
Categories. EducationEnvironmentNotable PlacesPolitics
 
Lyndon B. Johnson image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
4. Lyndon B. Johnson
This 1967 portrait of Lyndon B. Johnson by Peter Hurd hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“No political figure harnessed the forces of American politics better than Lyndon Johnson as majority leader of the Senate. His decision to serve as John Kennedy's vice president seemed like a demotion, but when Johnson became president upon Kennedy's assassination, his mastery of the legislative process and legendary persuasiveness produced a string of landmark legislation and actions: far­reaching civil rights acts, "war on poverty" initiatives, Medicare, Medicaid, major federal funding for education, and the appointment of the first African American —Thurgood Marshall— to the Supreme Court. Unfortunately, Johnson's escalation of the Vietnam War transformed his presidency from one of the most popular to one of the most maligned.

This portrait by Peter Hurd was meant to be Johnson's official White House likeness. But that plan was quickly scrapped after Johnson declared it ‘the ugliest thing I ever saw.’ Soon the pun was making the rounds in Washington that ‘artists should be seen around the White House-but not Hurd.’ ” — National Portrait Gallery
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 461 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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