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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Smithfield in Isle of Wight County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Fort Huger

Defending the James River

 

ó1862 Peninsula Campaign ó

 
Fort Huger CWT Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 18, 2010
1. Fort Huger CWT Marker
Inscription. (prelude)
In April 1862, Union forces under Gen. George B. McClellan began a major campaign to capture Richmond, marching west from Fort Monroe up the Peninsula between the York and James Rivers toward the Confederate capital. A Confederate army half their size opposed them. Slowly but inevitably, the Federal juggernaut overcame three Southern defensive lines and soon camped in Richmondís eastern suburbs. New commander Robert E. Lee, however, led a Confederate offensive that drove the Union army away during the Seven Daysí Battles, June 25-July 1.

In 1861, Confederate engineer Col. Andrew Talcott surveyed several defensive sites on the James River to protect Richmond, including Hardenís Bluff and nearby Fort Boykin. The site at Hardenís Bluff was named Fort Huger for Gen. Benjamin Huger, who commanded the Department of Norfolk. Slaves and free blacks constructed the fort under direction of the Confederate Engineer Bureau, and detachments of Lt. Col. Fletcher Archerís 5th Virginia infantry Battalion were posted here. By August 1861, several guns were ready to defend the channel. In March 1862, the fortís 13 guns included one 10-inch Columbiad, four 9 inch Dahlgrens, two 8-inch Columbiads, and six 32-pounder naval hot-shot guns.

Union Cmdr. John Rodgers led a gunboat squadron up the James River on May 8,
Fort Huger Historic Site image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, September 18, 2010
2. Fort Huger Historic Site
1862. After shelling Fort Boykin, USS Galena, USS Aroostook, and USS Port Royal steamed toward Fort Huger and attacked at 11:20 A.M. Aroostook and Port Royal took position downstream and shelled the bluffs. Galena passed Fort Huger seven times, firing to suppress the Confederate guns, which failed to damage the Union squadron. Rodgers finally stopped Galena near Fort Huger and pounded the Confederate ramparts while the other gunboats steamed past.

On May 12, to protect the Union supply line, the ironclads USS Monitor and USS Naugatuck ascended the James River. The Confederate gunners at both forts fired, but the ships steamed by undamaged. Five days later, U.S. marines and sailors occupied both forts without resistance. They found Fort Huger abandoned with the guns spiked, the carriages burnt, and the magazines destroyed.
 
Erected 2010 by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Location. 37° 6.663′ N, 76° 39.691′ W. Marker is near Smithfield, Virginia, in Isle of Wight County. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Talcott Terrace and Lawnes Neck Drive. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Smithfield VA 23430, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this
North Bastion of Fort Huger image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 2, 2009
3. North Bastion of Fort Huger
marker, measured as the crow flies. A different marker also named Fort Huger (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Fort Huger (approx. 2.7 miles away); Surry County / Isle of Wight County (approx. 3.1 miles away); Mulberry Point & Sir Thomas West (approx. 3.1 miles away); Pooleís Funeral Home (approx. 3.3 miles away); Lawneís Creek Church (approx. 3.6 miles away); Felker Army Airfield (approx. 3.8 miles away); Baconís Castle (approx. 3.8 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Smithfield.
 
More about this marker. On the lower left is a map of Fort Huger.

On the upper right is a sketch of "USS Galena, by Oscar Parkes".

On the lower right are portraits of "Gen. Benjamin Huger Courtesy Library of Congress" and "Col. Andrew Talcott Courtesy Smithsonian Institution".
 
Also see . . .
1. Historic Fort Huger. Smithfield & Isle of Wight Convention & Visitors Bureau (Submitted on September 19, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

2. Fort Huger (pdf file). National Register of Historic Places (Submitted on September 20, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesWar, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
South Bastion of Fort Huger image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 2, 2009
4. South Bastion of Fort Huger
Plan of Fort Huger at Hardy's Bluff. image. Click for full size.
5. Plan of Fort Huger at Hardy's Bluff.
Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division [Map F232 Is8 1863:1]
Portrait of Maj. Gen. Benjamin Huger, officer of the Confederate Army image. Click for full size.
circa 1865
6. Portrait of Maj. Gen. Benjamin Huger, officer of the Confederate Army
Library of Congress [LC-B813-1978 A]
Col Andrew Talcott image. Click for full size.
By Thomas Sully
7. Col Andrew Talcott
Fort Wiki
USS Galena image. Click for full size.
By Oscar Parkes, 1936
8. USS Galena
United States Naval History and Heritage Command, # NH 59541
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,220 times since then and 19 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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