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Colmar Manor in Prince George's County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
Historic Fort Lincoln Cemetery
 
Historic Fort Lincoln Cemetery Marker Photo, Click for full size
By F. Robby, January 2, 2004
1. Historic Fort Lincoln Cemetery Marker
 
Inscription. Fort Lincoln Cemetery was chartered in 1912 by an act of the Maryland General Assembly and presently contains 178 acres.

Here, at Fort Lincoln Cemetery, masterworks of marble, granite and bronze stand in solemn dignity and provides a tranquil setting for those visiting the final resting places of their loved ones.

Fort Lincoln property consists of parcels from three early land grants: Scotland (1685), Barbadoes (1685) and Chillum Castle Manor (1763). A few of these early land owners were Col. Henry Darnall, William Thompson, Richard Evans, Williams Diggs, Charles Carroll, the Barrister (relative of Charles Carroll, signer of the Declaration of Independence), George Conn, John Veitch, his descendants, John C. Rives (co-founder of the Globe newspaper), and others.

As an early farm land, three events were to disturb this otherwise pastoral setting: 1) In 1792 a survey was made and the District of Columbia boundary marker NE No. 7 was placed. 2) Near this spot on August 24, 1814, marines and flotillamen under the command of Joshua Barney fought a gallant stand against the British redcoats in the Battle of Bladensburg. 3) In 1861, after the bombardment of Fort Sumter (the beginning of the Civil War), the property was seized by the United States Government for the location of Battery Jameson (named for Brig.
 
Historic Fort Lincoln Cemetery Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Craig Swain, July 18, 2010
2. Historic Fort Lincoln Cemetery Marker
 
Gen. Charles D. Jameson).

The remains of Battery Jameson are still visible near the old spring house. President Abraham Lincoln is said to have met her to discuss army stragey. The battery served to reinforce Fort Lincoln which was located a short distance away in the District of Columbia.

Fort Lincoln Cemetery was named after Fort Lincoln which strategically protected the nation's capitol during the Civil War. Fort Lincoln became the headquarters for the Second Pennsylvania Veteran Heavy Artillery. Men from this unit staffed Battery Jameson.
 
Erected 1979 by Prince George's County Historical Society.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Defenses of Washington marker series.
 
Location. 38° 55.898′ N, 76° 57.29′ W. Marker is in Colmar Manor, Maryland, in Prince George's County. Marker is on Bladensburg Road 0.2 miles south of 37th Street, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Brentwood MD 20722, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dueling Grounds (approx. 0.2 miles away); Little Church of Fort Lincoln (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bladensburg Dueling Grounds (approx. 0.2 miles away); Second Line Falls (approx. 0.2 miles away but has been reported missing); a different marker also named Dueling Grounds (approx. 0.2 miles away); Fort Lincoln Mausoleum (approx. mile away); Battle of Bladensburg (approx. mile away); Barney Monument (approx. mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Colmar Manor.
 
Fort Lincoln Cemetery Photo, Click for full size
By F. Robby, January 2, 2004
3. Fort Lincoln Cemetery
 

 
Also see . . .  History of Fort Lincoln Cemetery. from the Fort Lincoln Funeral Home and Fort Lincoln Cemetery web site. (Submitted on June 29, 2009.) 
 
District of Columbia Boundary Marker Photo, Click for full size
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
4. District of Columbia Boundary Marker
The boundary marker, laid in 1792, is located about 8-tenths of a mile inside the cemetery grounds, alongside the fenceline of the cemetery. Most of the markings on the marker are now below the ground.
 
 
Battery Jameson Photo, Click for full size
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
5. Battery Jameson
Remains of Battery Jameson that reinforced Fort Lincoln during the Civil War.
 
 
Old Spring House Photo, Click for full size
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
6. Old Spring House
The spring house dates to 1683, reportedly one of the oldest buildings still standing in Maryland.
 
 
Site of the Battle of Bladensburg Photo, Click for full size
By F. Robby, January 28, 2008
7. Site of the Battle of Bladensburg
Commodore Joshua Barney and 500 Marines were overrun by almost 5,000 British troops on their way to burning the White House and the Capitol building in the War of 1812. This memorial sits behind the mauseleum alongside the fenceline of the cemetery.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on November 17, 2007, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 5,042 times since then. Photos:   1. submitted on November 17, 2007, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.   2. submitted on July 18, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   3. submitted on November 17, 2007, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on January 29, 2008, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.
 
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