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Fort Scott in Bourbon County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

In Memory of The Soldiers

of the 1st Regiment Kansas Colored Volunteers

 
 
In Memory of The Soldiers of the 1st Regiment Kansas Colored Volunteers Marker image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 1992
1. In Memory of The Soldiers of the 1st Regiment Kansas Colored Volunteers Marker







Inscription.
who gave their lives in battle
May 18, 1863
near Sherwood, Missouri

Henry Aggleson Pvt Co I
Greene Allen Pvt Co H
John Booth Pvt Co H
Edward Cockerell Pvt Co E
William Grisby Pvt Co D
Frank Haze Pvt Co F
Milton Johnson Pvt Co I
William Knight Pvt Co F
Dennis Lyons Pvt Co C
George Mitchell Pvt Co F
Minor Porter Pvt Co F
William Smith Pvt Co E
George Webb Pvt Co D
Peter White Pvt Co E
Riley Young Pvt Co A

2nd Kansas Volunteer Battery

Garrett Anderson Pvt
Joseph Endicott Pvt
Vanrenseller Hancock Pvt

 
Erected 1988.
 
Location. 37° 49.319′ N, 94° 41.56′ W. Marker is in Fort Scott, Kansas, in Bourbon County. Marker can be reached from East National Avenue. Click for map. At the Fort Scott National Cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 900 East National Avenue, Fort Scott KS 66701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Jeannette Huntington Ware (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Fort Scott National Cemetery (about 400 feet away); Combat Infantrymen
Fort Scott National Historic Site, Kansas image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, October 1992
2. Fort Scott National Historic Site, Kansas
The mission of Fort Scott National Historic Site is to preserve, protect and interpret nationally significant historic resources related to the opening of the West, the Permanent Indian Frontier, the Mexican-American War, "Bleeding Kansas," the Civil War and the expansion of railroads.
(approx. 0.2 miles away); Normal Victory Bell (approx. 0.9 miles away); Eugene Ware Elementary School (approx. 1.2 miles away); Mercy Hospital Cross (approx. 1.4 miles away); Memorial Hall (approx. 1.4 miles away); In Honored Memory (approx. 1.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Scott.
 
More about this marker. One source lists the year it was dedicated as 1984. Another lists it as May 14, 1988. Any confirmation of the dedication date would be appreciated.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. Markers for the 1st Regiment Kansas Colored Volunteers.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Scott National Historic Site - "First to Serve". USCTs at Fort Scott (Submitted on December 22, 2007, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

2. Forgotten Warriors. American Indian soldiers at Fort Scott (Submitted on December 22, 2007, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.) 

3. Fatal Casualties from Engagement near Sherwood, Jasper County, Missouri, May 18, 1863. On May 18th 1863 a few miles northwest of
In Memory of The Soldiers Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., January 8, 2012
3. In Memory of The Soldiers Marker
At right, in memorial section of cemetery (no interments) for service members whose remains are unaccounted for (unknown, lost at sea, etc).
the present site of Joplin, a detachment of the 1st Kansas Col. Vol. Inf. were attacked by Confederates under Thomas R. Livingston. The ruthless nature of the attack, (see Ajt. Gen. Report St. of Kansas, Military History of Kansas Regiments pg. 246.) resulted in Federal retaliation on May 19th with the burning of the town of Sherwood. It is generally believed that a number of former Jasper County slaves may have served in Kansas regiments at this time.
MEMORIAL TO THOSE KILLED NEAR SHERWOOD
The bodies of the black soldiers killed in action near Sherwood were not properly buried. The bodies were placed in a farm home at the scene of the engagement and burned. On May 14, 1988 a memorial was dedicated at Ft. Scott National Cemetery to honor those who were killed near Sherwood.
Source: First Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Fatal Casualties from Engagement near Sherwood, Jasper County, Missouri, May 18, 1863. Springfield-Greene County Library District Springfield, Missouri (Submitted on January 25, 2011.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. 1st and 2nd Kansas Colored Volunteers
During the Civil War, Kansas was the first state to recruit and train military units comprised of Black soldiers. Between July 1862 and October 1863, the 1st and 2nd Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry Regiments were recruited in eastern Kansas, trained and ultimately mustered into the Union Army at Fort Scott. The enlistees included many escapees from slavery in Missouri, Arkansas, the Indian Territory and elsewhere. They would eventually compile a proud combat record in Civil War's Western Theater.

In October 1862, soldiers of the 1st Kansas Colored had the distinction of being the first uniformed Black fighters to engage the Confederate army, defeating a Rebel cavalry unit at a cost to themselves of six African Americans, one Cherokee Indian and one White officer killed, near Butler, Missouri in a skirmish known as the "Battle of Island Mound." (Regrettably, the names of the Black heroes do not appear on the African American Civil War Memorial in Washington, D.C. since the action occurred before the Kansas Volunteers were actually mustered into federal service on January 13, 1863.)

After the engagement at Sherwood, Missouri (a.k.a. "The Battle of Reeder Farm"), the First Kansas Colored would see action in five other major battles, the most famous of which occurred at Honey Springs in Indian Territory where the regiment suffered heavy casualties earning undying glory for its pivotal role in the Union victory on July 17, 1863.

On December 13, 1864, during a general reorganization of the Union's all-Black regiments, the 1st Kansas Colored Infantry was re-designated the 79th United States Colored Infantry, and the 2nd Kansas Colored Infantry became the 83rd United States Colored Infantry.
    — Submitted April 1, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.

 
Additional keywords. Battle of Reeder Farm, Sherwood, Mo.; Island Mound; United States Colored Troops; USCT; 79th U.S. Colored Infantry; 83rd U.S. Colored Infantry
 
Categories. African AmericansHeroesMilitaryWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,726 times since then and 4 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   3. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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