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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Brookeville in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

In This House

 
 
In This House Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 20, 2006
1. In This House Marker
Inscription. In this house August 26-27, 1814, President James Madison and Richard Rush, Attorney General, were sheltered after the burning by the British of the public buildings at Washington August 24-25, 1814.
 
Erected 1914 by the Montgomery County Committee of the National Star-Spangled Banner Commission.
 
Location. 39° 10.916′ N, 77° 3.453′ W. Marker is in Brookeville, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker is on Market Street east of Georgia Avenue (Maryland Route 97), on the left when traveling east. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 205 Market Street, Brookeville MD 20833, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 6 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Madison House (here, next to this marker); Bentley House (a few steps from this marker); The Miller's Cottage (within shouting distance of this marker); Historic Brookeville (within shouting distance of this marker); Brookeville Angel (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); August 26, 1814 (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Brookeville.
 
More about this marker. Marker is on the wall of the house, to the left of the front door.
 
Regarding In This House.
Madison House image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 20, 2006
2. Madison House
Once Postmaster Caleb Bentley's residence, it is now known as Madison House.
This house is a private residence.
 
Also see . . .
1. Madison House. (PDF) Maryland Inventory of Historic Properties, M:23-65-2. (Submitted on April 5, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

2. Maryland Town Celebrates Its 15 Hours Of Fame By: Rebecca Sheir September 6, 2013. By Rebecca Sheir, September 6, 2013, WAMU Radio. (Submitted on April 5, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 

3. (PDF) Thomas-Bentley House (Madison House). Catherine C. Lavoie, Historic American Buildings Survey, HABS No. MD-1375, 2011. (Submitted on April 5, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. Caleb Bentley House (Madison House)
Caleb Bentley and his first wife Sarah Brooke Bentley moved into this house around 1800. The house had been built by Richard Thomas a few years earlier. Caleb Bentley was Brookeville's first postmaster and kept a store. The Bentley's were Quakers who opposed the war of 1812 and indeed all wars. But on the evening of August 26, 1814, Caleb and his second wife Henrietta opened their house to President Madison, and a large party including twenty dragoons who had fled Washington on the 24th. President Madison arrived in Brookeville after failing to rendezvous with US Troops at Rockville. He had spent two days traveling through the northern Virginia countryside. Mrs. Bentley reportedly slept on the floor with her little
Two Plaques image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 2, 2014
3. Two Plaques
"In This House" & "Madison House" markers on the west front of 205 Market Street.
daughter so the president could use her bed. On the 27th, Madison heard from Secretary of State Monroe and upon learning that the British had left the Capital returned to Washington, having spent 15 hours in Brookeville.
    — Submitted April 5, 2014, by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.

 
Categories. LandmarksNotable EventsWar of 1812
 
Caleb Bentley image. Click for full size.
4. Caleb Bentley
From a Daquerreotype Taken About 1850, Appearing in the ACHS inventory form.
Madison House image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 2, 2014
5. Madison House
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,400 times since then and 31 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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