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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Brookeville in Montgomery County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Brookeville

Prisoners Paroled

 
 
Prisoners Paroled Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 20, 2006
1. Prisoners Paroled Marker
Inscription. On June 28, 1863, Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart left Rockville with three cavalry brigades, 125 captured Union supply wagons, and more than 400 military and civilian prisoners, arriving in Brookeville that night. At every opportunity, prisoners Maj. James C. Duane (Chief Engineer, Army of the Potomac) and Capt. Nathaniel Michler (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) urged Stuart to parole them. Finally consenting, Stuart prepared paroles at Brookeville and at Cooksville the next morning, slowing his advance.

The prisoners were not fed. Only white men were permitted to stop for water as they crossed streams. The Confederates slashed at blacks if they attempted to drink and shot one who was too weak to continue.

Most civilian prisoners walked home from Brookeville. Thomas Bailey and Mortimer Moulden (Rockville's postmaster and Provost Marshal) refused parole because they feared Eblen, a recuperating young Union soldier, would be shot if he could not keep the pace. They were marched to Cooksville and released the night of June 29.
Map on Corner of Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 20, 2006
2. Map on Corner of Marker
Bailey and Moulden helped Eblen back to Rockville, sometimes carrying him. Altogether, they walked 70 miles.

Hood's Mill. While Stuart paroled prisoners, Gen. Fitzhugh Lee took his brigade north to the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad at Hood's Mill. Arriving just after dawn on June 29, 1863, cavalrymen tore up the track, destroyed the bridge at Sykesville, and cut the telegraph line, severing one of the Army of the Potomac's means of communication with Washington.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Maryland Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 10.831′ N, 77° 3.519′ W. Marker is in Brookeville, Maryland, in Montgomery County. Marker is on High Street (Maryland Route 97) south of Market Street (Maryland Route 97), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in front of the Brookeville Academy Community Center. Marker is at or near this postal address: 5 High Street, Brookeville MD 20833, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 5 other
Markers in front of the Brookeville Academy image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, May 20, 2006
3. Markers in front of the Brookeville Academy
markers are within walking distance of this marker. August 26, 1814 (here, next to this marker); Newlin’s Mill Millstone (a few steps from this marker); A Refuge (within shouting distance of this marker); Brookeville Angel (within shouting distance of this marker); In This House (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Brookeville.
 
More about this marker. One of the series of Maryland Civil War Trails markers. This one is on the Gettysburg Campaign.
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Colonel Duane & Captain MIchler image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 2, 2014
4. Colonel Duane & Captain MIchler
Bvt. Col. James C. Duane
Capt. Nathaniel Michler (as a major)
Close-up of photos on marker
U.S. Military History Institute
General J. E. B. Stuart image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 2, 2014
5. General J. E. B. Stuart
Close-up of photo on marker
General Fitzhugh Lee image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 2, 2014
6. General Fitzhugh Lee
Close-up of photo on marker
Troops Destroying Railroad Tracks image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, April 2, 2014
7. Troops Destroying Railroad Tracks
Close up of Alfred Waud drawing on marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,122 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   4, 5, 6, 7. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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