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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fort Apache in Navajo County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

First Commanding Officer's Quarters (101)

 
 
First Commanding Officer's Quarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, September 25, 2010
1. First Commanding Officer's Quarters Marker
Inscription. This log cabin is the oldest surviving building at Fort Apache. The westernmost of a series of eight log cabins built in 1871 to form Officers' Row, this cabin was designated the Commanding Officer's Quarters. It was originally an 18 by 20 foot log pen with a canvas floor. A second pen, attached by an enclosed, ten-foot wide dogtrot was added later. Further additions include a log extension on the northwest side and wood frame additions constructed after the installation of a steam-powered sawmill in 1872. Like all officers' quarters constructed prior to 1883, the kitchen was housed in a detached shed behind the cabin.

The log quarters leaked and were drafty, and were gradually replaced by frame, and then in some cases, stone buildings. This cabin continued to be used as housing for junior officers throughout the Fort period. In the 1920's and '30s the cabin housed teachers for the Theodore Roosevelt School, and later was the home of the tribal trapper.

In 1969 the log cabin became the first home of the White Mountain Apache Tribe's Cultural Center and Museum. It was restored in 1994.
 
Erected by Fort Apache Historical Park, White Mountain Apache Tribe.
 
Location. 33° 47.46′ N, 109° 59.457′ 
First Commanding Officer's Quarters image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, September 25, 2010
2. First Commanding Officer's Quarters
Marker is located behind the white fence.
W. Marker is in Fort Apache, Arizona, in Navajo County. Marker is at the intersection of General Crook Street and Scout Street, on the left when traveling east on General Crook Street. Click for map. Marker is located at the Fort Apache Historic Park, 0.7 miles east of AZ-73 on Fort Apache Road. Marker is in this post office area: Fort Apache AZ 85926, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Captain's Quarters (102 and 103) (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Barracks Row (about 400 feet away); Girls' Dormitory (120) (about 500 feet away); Parade Ground (about 500 feet away); Commanding Officers' Quarters (104) (about 500 feet away); B.I.A. Club House (105) (about 600 feet away); T.R. School Cafeteria (119) (about 600 feet away); Officer's Quarters (106) (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Fort Apache.
 
More about this marker. All visitors to Fort Apache Historic Park must first register and pay admission at the Culture Center, just to the left as you enter the park.
 
Also see . . .
1. Fort Apache Historic Park. (Submitted on October 10, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.)
2. Commanding Officer's Quarters - General Crook's Log Cabin. The Fort Apache Walking Tour description of the Commanding Officer's Quarters,
Photo Displayed on Marker image. Click for full size.
3. Photo Displayed on Marker
Troops from 10th Calvary in garrison dress near west end of Parade Ground, 1887. Building 101 is the last structure on left in the background.

Arizona Historical Society #63490.
Building 101. (Submitted on October 10, 2010.) 

3. Fort Apache History. The White Mountain Apache Tripe gives the history of the area including photos. (Submitted on October 10, 2010.) 
 
Categories. Forts, CastlesNative AmericansWars, US Indian
 
Photo Displayed on Marker image. Click for full size.
4. Photo Displayed on Marker
Cabin, circa 1930. Photo by Will C. Barnes, Arizona Historical Society #1206
Sign at Entrance to the Fort Apache Historical Park image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, September 25, 2010
5. Sign at Entrance to the Fort Apache Historical Park
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 671 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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