“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Fairfield in Franklin County, Vermont — The American Northeast (New England)

Chester A. Arthur

Birthplace of 21st President

Chester A. Arthur Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, August 1, 2010
1. Chester A. Arthur Marker
Although the exact location is debated, Chester A. Arthur was born on Oct. 5, 1829 in Fairfield. He became a New York lawyer and politician and was elected Vice-President in 1880. Upon the assasination of James Garfield, Arthur became president on Sept. 20, 1881. His administration was distinguished by the creation of the U.S. Civil Service, better relations with Central and South America, and the revival of the U.S. Navy. Arthur died Nov. 18, 1886. The State-Owned Historic Site is 5 miles northwest from here.
Erected 2003 by Vermont division for historic preservation.
Location. 44° 48.096′ N, 72° 56.735′ W. Marker is in Fairfield, Vermont, in Franklin County. Marker is at the intersection of Vermont Route 36 and North Road, on the right when traveling west on State Route 36. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Fairfield VT 05455, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 10 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Consuelo Northrop Bailey (about 700 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Chester A. Arthur (approx. 4.8 miles away); Sheldon, Vermont (approx. 5.5 miles away); Colonel Elisha Sheldon
Wideview of Chester A. Arthur Marker image. Click for full size.
By Kevin Craft, circa August 1, 2010
2. Wideview of Chester A. Arthur Marker
(approx. 5.7 miles away); St. Albans Raid (approx. 6.8 miles away); Camp Holbrook (approx. 6.8 miles away); Fenian Raids (approx. 7 miles away); Birthplace of Larry Gardner (approx. 10 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Fairfield.
Categories. GovernmentPolitics
Chester A. Arthur image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, August 9, 2015
3. Chester A. Arthur
This 1881 portrait of Chester Arthur by Ole Peter Hansen Balling hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“When Vice President Chester Arthur succeeded to the presidency on the death of James Garfield, a newspaper noted that he was ‘not a man who would have entered anybody's mind’ as a worthy candidate for the office. Indeed, as a major player in a spoils system that reduced the civil service to a vehicle for rewarding party faithful, he struck many as an emblem of all that was wrong in American politics.

As president, however, Arthur rose above his past to promote landmark legislation designed to curb the spoils system. He also proved to be a foe of other forms of corruption. When, for example, a ‘pork barrel’ bill for public improvements reached his desk, he vetoed it.

This head-and-shoulders portrait can only hint at the fashionable figure that Arthur cut. With his muttonchop whiskers ‘trimmed to the perfection point’ and his suits made of only the finest fabrics, he invariably looked like the very epitome of the well-bred Victorian gentleman.” — National Portrait Gallery
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec. This page has been viewed 590 times since then and 70 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Kevin Craft of Bedford, Quebec.   3. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement