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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

John M. Olin

1851 - 1924

 
 
John M. Olin Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, October 13, 2010
1. John M. Olin Marker
Inscription. A trust fund established by Mr. Olin President of the Madison Park and Pleasure Drive Association from 1894 to 1910, made possible the construction of architectural features in this garden
 
Erected 1953.
 
Location. 43° 5.549′ N, 89° 20.121′ W. Marker is in Madison, Wisconsin, in Dane County. Marker can be reached from Atwood Avenue 0.2 miles west of Walter Street, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. The marker is located in the gardens of Olbrich Park. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3330 Atwood Avenue, Madison WI 53704, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Olbrich Park (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Starkweather's Harried History (about 500 feet away); Olbrich's Thai Pavilion and Gardens (about 600 feet away); Third Lake Passage (about 800 feet away); Riley House (approx. 0.3 miles away); "Let The Great Spirits Soar" (approx. 0.3 miles away); Bear and Lynx Effigy Mounds (approx. 0.3 miles away); Corry Carriage House (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Madison.
 
Regarding John M. Olin. According to an undated pamphlet published by the Olbrich Botanical Gardens and entitled
John M. Olin Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, October 13, 2010
2. John M. Olin Marker
The marker is on the stone tower, which the Olbrich librarian said was a chimney for the old greenhouses. She also noted that most of the "architectural features" mentioned in the marker have been replaced over the years.
Olbrich Botanical Gardens, A Brief History [see the link included below], "The first work towards establishing the gardens began in 1952 when the Olin Trust Fund gave the Madison Parks Commission $22,688 to begin development. This resulted in the twin shelter buildings that are still extant today [see photos entitled "Shelter Buildings" and "Closeup of Shelter Building"] and in the large formal space behind them that was originally the Rose Mall [see photo entitled "Original Rose Mall"]. Another grant from the Olin Fund in 1957 gave the gardens its first greenhouse, a structure that was soon expanded to serve as an informal center for area gardeners."
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This is a list of markers that mention John Olin.
 
Also see . . .  Olbrich Gardens Historical Timeline. (Submitted on October 19, 2010, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.)
 
Categories. Charity & Public Work
 
Shelter Buildings image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, October 19, 2010
3. Shelter Buildings
The shelter buildings are on the far right and the far left, with the Bolz Conservancy in the background.
Closeup of Shelter Building image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, October 19, 2010
4. Closeup of Shelter Building
Original Rose Mall image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, October 19, 2010
5. Original Rose Mall
View of Original Rose Mall from Shelter Building image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, October 19, 2010
6. View of Original Rose Mall from Shelter Building
Rose Garden Fountain and Tower at Olbrich Gardens image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, October 16, 2010
7. Rose Garden Fountain and Tower at Olbrich Gardens
Weeping Wall in the Rose Garden at Olbrich Gardens image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, October 16, 2010
8. Weeping Wall in the Rose Garden at Olbrich Gardens
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 515 times since then and 18 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   7, 8. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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