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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Madison in Dane County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Olin Terrace

 
 
Olin Terrace Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, September 2, 2010
1. Olin Terrace Marker
Inscription. Olin Terrace honors the memory of John Myers Olin (1851-1924). Mr. Olin was a U.W. law professor and the president of, and driving force behind, the original Madison Park and Pleasure Drive Association. He was an energetic fundraiser and for his tireless efforts, was eulogized as being "The Father of Madison's Park System." The fountain and balustrade were financed by the John M. Olin Memorial Fund while the labor was completed in 1934 as part of a Civil Works Administration project.
 
Location. 43° 4.345′ N, 89° 22.878′ W. Marker is in Madison, Wisconsin, in Dane County. Marker is on West Wilson Street near Martin Luther King, Jr. Boulevard, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Madison WI 53703, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Fairchild Home (a few steps from this marker); Pioneer Men and Women (a few steps from this marker); State Office Building (a few steps from this marker); Madison Club (within shouting distance of this marker); Madison is an Indian mound capital (within shouting distance of this marker); John A. Urich
Olin Terrace Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, September 2, 2010
2. Olin Terrace Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); David James Schaefer (within shouting distance of this marker); U.S. Post Office and Courthouse (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Madison.
 
Regarding Olin Terrace. According to David Mollenhoff in the second edition of Madison, A History of the Formative Years, pp. 139-40, what came to be known as Olin Terrace was one of the first three city-owned parks in Madison (at a time when private parks predominated). He described it as "a 132-foot wide cliff-like street end at the foot of Monona Avenue." The cliff descended to Lake Monona.

Apparently, the balustrade mentioned in the marker was a railing on top of a retaining wall at the Lake Monona end of the terrace that replaced the cliff. In 1987, the retaining wall became the canvas for a controversial tromp l'oeil mural by Richard Haas. The mural is now obscured by the Monona Terrace Community and Convention Center.

The fountain mentioned in the marker is no longer on the terrace, but there is a fountain on top of Monona Terrace, which is at the end of Olin Terrace. Olin Terrace is now the main pedestrian access route to the Monona Terrace Community and Convention
Olin Terrace Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, September 2, 2010
3. Olin Terrace Marker
View of Olin Terrace with the marker in the lower right and the fountain of and main entrance to the Monona Terrace Community and Convention Center in the background.
Center.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. This is a list of markers that mention John Olin.
 
Also see . . .  Movers & Shapers. Article names Olin as one of the 10 most influential people in Madison history. (Submitted on September 3, 2010, by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.) 
 
Categories. Charity & Public Work
 
Olin Terrace Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, September 2, 2010
4. Olin Terrace Marker
Wider view of Olin Terrace.
Olin Terrace image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, September 2, 2010
5. Olin Terrace
"Olin Terrace" carved in stones that originally and still frame the entrance to the terrace.
Olin Terrace Remnant image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, March 12, 2011
6. Olin Terrace Remnant
These are apparently remnants of the balustrade mentioned in the marker, which was removed with the construction of Monona Terrace. These are stored near the old Garver Feed and Supply Company factory on the east side of Madison. Apparently, the fountain mentioned in the marker is stored inside the factory.
Olin Terrace Dedication Stone image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, March 31, 2014
7. Olin Terrace Dedication Stone
The dedication stone in the center of this photo, previously in storage as documented by the next photo, has been returned to its rightful place at Olin Terrace.
Olin Terrace Dedication Stone image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, March 12, 2011
8. Olin Terrace Dedication Stone
This dedication stone was removed from Olin Terrace with the construction of Monona Terrace and stored near the old Garver Feed and Supply Company factory on the east side of Madison.
Nearby Dedication Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, September 2, 2010
9. Nearby Dedication Marker
Closeup of Nearby Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, September 2, 2010
10. Closeup of Nearby Marker
Text: We are dedicating this marker in loving memory and deepest appreciation to the men and women who have with zeal and dedication served the City of Madison. Erected by the American Revolution Bicentennial Commission of Madison, Wisconsin November 28, 1976.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 947 times since then. Last updated on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   4, 5. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   6. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   7. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   8. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin.   9, 10. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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