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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Mazomanie in Dane County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

Wisconsin Heights Battlefield

 
 
Wisconsin Heights Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, June 26, 2010
1. Wisconsin Heights Battlefield Marker
Inscription. Near this site the Sauk chieftain Black Hawk and his band were overtaken by Wisconsin and Illinois troops on July 21, 1832
 
Erected 1923 by John Bell Chapter, DAR Madison.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Black Hawk War, and the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
 
Location. 43° 14.702′ N, 89° 43.401′ W. Marker is near Mazomanie, Wisconsin, in Dane County. Marker is on State Highway 78 0.4 miles south of County Road Y, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. The marker can be accessed by a path beginning at the Battle of Wisconsin Heights marker. Marker is in this post office area: Mazomanie WI 53560, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Battle of Wisconsin Heights (within shouting distance of this marker); Mazomanie Sand Barrens (approx. half a mile away); Culver's (approx. 1.8 miles away); Sauk City (approx. 2 miles away); Free Congregation of Sauk County (approx. 2 miles away); August W. Derleth (approx. 2.3 miles away); Father Adalbert Inama -- St. Norbert House (approx. 2.3 miles away); In Memory of Rev. Adalbert Inama, O. Praem. (approx. 2.3 miles away).
 
More about this marker.
Wisconsin Heights Battlefield Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dawn Toman, June 26, 2010
2. Wisconsin Heights Battlefield Marker
View from the road.
The John Bell Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution restored this marker during the summer of 2009. Based in Madison, Wisconsin, this group is also a chapter of the Wisconsin Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution, and was founded May 16, 1901. The chapter is named after Private John Bell, as the founders felt that a private was most typical of those brave patriots who had fought and sacrificed to achieve our freedom.
 
Categories. Native AmericansWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 1,485 times since then and 30 times this year. Last updated on , by Kim Kendall of Phoenix, Arizona. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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