Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cottage Grove in Dane County, Wisconsin — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Wisconsin Granger Movement

 
 
The Wisconsin Granger Movement Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, September 4, 2010
1. The Wisconsin Granger Movement Marker
Inscription. The Cottage Grove Grange, which became a leader in the state and national Grange movement, had its meeting hall near this site shortly after the Civil War. As a community center it became a significant cultural and social influence for pioneer farm families. The spirited discussions held here focused attention on the expanding importance of agriculture, the rampant malpractices of railroad companies, and the growing national farmers' movement.

William R. Taylor, local farm leader and Master of this Grange, was elected the Granger Governor of Wisconsin in 1874. He became a contributing force in the efforts to regulate railroads in the state. Ultimately, from these efforts and with the support of the Granges throughout the state, the Railroad Commission was established, later to become the Wisconsin Public Service Commission.

These achievements boosted Wisconsin to a preeminent position as a national leader in public utility regulation.
 
Erected 1978 by the Dane County Historical Society. (Marker Number 17.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Wisconsin, Dane County Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 43° 5.202′ N, 89° 12.626′ W. Marker is in Cottage
The Wisconsin Granger Movement Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, September 4, 2010
2. The Wisconsin Granger Movement Marker
Grove, Wisconsin, in Dane County. Marker is on West Cottage Grove Road (County Highway Bb) half a mile west of Main Street (County Highway N), on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Cottage Grove WI 53527, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Alexander Smith House (approx. 4.1 miles away); Conical Mound (approx. 4.2 miles away); Drohman Farm (approx. 4.4 miles away); Hiestand School (approx. 4.9 miles away); Hiestand Park (approx. 5.1 miles away); Boutell House (approx. 5.4 miles away); Reindahl Memorial Park (approx. 5.9 miles away); Edna Taylor Conservation Park (approx. 5.9 miles away).
 
Regarding The Wisconsin Granger Movement. According to the Houghton Mifflin Reader's Companion to American History, the Granger Movement was a 19th-century political movement by farmers. It began on December 4, 1867, in Washington, D.C., with the formation of a secret fraternal society for farmers called the National Grange of the Patrons of Husbandry. During the next decade it spread rapidly, fed by agrarian desperation over hard times, high railroad shipping rates, and tight money, and by 1875, the membership had passed 850,000. Its central issue was the exploitation of farmers by railroads, merchants, and banks and its remedies for those
The Wisconsin Granger Movement Marker image. Click for full size.
By William J. Toman, September 4, 2010
3. The Wisconsin Granger Movement Marker
ills included farmer-owned cooperatives and banks and state laws regulating railroads and grain elevators. Opposition from business interests and the Grangers' own political inexperience led few of their initiatives to succeed, but they set important precedents with their legislation, particularly those regulating railroads.
 
Categories. AgriculturePoliticsRailroads & Streetcars
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 749 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by William J. Toman of Green Lake, Wisconsin. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement