Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Murfreesboro in Rutherford County, Tennessee — The American South (East South Central)
 

Remembering Sacrifices - in Stone

 
 
Remembering Sacrifices - in Stone Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 28, 2010
1. Remembering Sacrifices - in Stone Marker
The background of the marker is a sketch of The Army of the Cumberland fighting in Tennessee in 1863 by Alfred Waud.
Inscription. "...around the spot where the monument was erected...to the best recollection 113 of our regiment were killed and wounded...it is hoped that the monument will remain standing as a memorial to the gallant and patriotic men of General Hazen's brigade who fell...in defense of Union and Liberty."
Edward Crebbin, 1st Lieutenant, 9th Indiana Volunteer Infantry, in charge of building the Hazen Monument in 1863

It may surprise you to learn that the monument you see on most Civil War battlefields were built 30 or more years after Appomattox. As battlefield veterans entered the final chapter of their lives, they wanted to honor and preserve the memory of the sacrifices they had seen.

The Hazen Brigade Monument you see ahead is unlike any other. Union soldiers built it in 1863, just six months after the battle. At that time, the outcome of the war was still impossible to predict. Comrades of the men buried here - not civilian contractors - laid up these stones. Before the famous marble monuments at Shiloh, Chickamauga, or Gettysburg existed, travelers riding the Nashville & Chattanooga railroad would see this somber stonework - a constant reminder of what it cost Hazen's Brigade to stand fast all day long at Stones River.

It is the oldest intact Civil War monument in the nation.

Soldiers Buried Here
6th
Marker with the Cemetery and Monument in the Background image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 28, 2010
2. Marker with the Cemetery and Monument in the Background
Kentucky Volunteer Infantry
United States Army
September 1861 - January 1865
Franz Bassel - John Lenhart
William Buck - Albert McFarland
James Davis - Thomas Nicolas
Calvin Hart - Joseph Parish
Harrison Hughes - James Porter
Lovy Kidwell

41st Ohio Volunteer Infantry
United States Army
October 1861 - November 1865
Henry Cardwell - John Martly
George Cotton - Joshua McKee
Charles Hitner - James Mulberry
Joseph Kram - Bernard Schneller
Joseph Maas - Charles Todd
Adam Mans

9th Indiana Volunteer Infantry
United States Army
September 1861 - September 1865
Jesse Quick - John Wagoner - Isaac Sinks
Emmer Rossiter - Landon Forquar - George Weathers
Henry Simmons - Daniel Hall - Daniel Willis
Jeremiah Snyder - Jonathan Herald - Charles Zollers
Ebaneze Troutman - George Huyler
Sylvester Winchester - Henry Kesler
Joel Strong - Orton Shore

110th Illinois Volunteer Infantry
United States Army
September 1862 - June 1865

Jesse Payne
James Rice
Willis Strickling
Unknown soldier from Illinois
Unknown soldier from Illinois

Colonel William B. Hazen
This 31-year old, no-nonsense West Pointer commanded a brigade of four volunteer infantry regiments: the 6th Kentucky, the 41st Ohio, the 9th Indiana, and the 110th Illinois. Over 400 of Hazen's troops fell in battle here
Cemetery and Preservation image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, August 28, 2010
3. Cemetery and Preservation
The cemetery lays, as it did during the war, aside the railroad line. Beyond the railroad line is a concrete vendor's mixing plant. As often pointed out, the progress of the present has often overshadowed the memories of the past. This view is often used by preservation groups, citing the incalculable cost of the damage to historically significant landscapes.
at Stones River.
 
Erected by Stones River National Battlefield - National Park Service - U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 35° 52.575′ N, 86° 25.681′ W. Marker is in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, in Rutherford County. Marker is on Old Nashville Highway, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located at tour stop five, the Round Forest, in Stones River National Battlefield Park. Marker is in this post office area: Murfreesboro TN 37129, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Anchoring the Union Line (a few steps from this marker); Struggle for Round Forest (a few steps from this marker but has been reported missing); Hazen's Artillery (a few steps from this marker); Hazen Brigade Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Hazen's Brigade Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); Slave, Soldier, Citizen (within shouting distance of this marker); Parsons' Batteries Heavily Engaged (approx. 0.2 miles away); Donelsonís Brigade at Murfreesboro (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Murfreesboro.
 
Also see . . .  Stones River National Battlefield. National Park Service site. (Submitted on October 31, 2010, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 755 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement