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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Milton in Sussex County, Delaware — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Shipbuilding on the Broadkill

 
 
Shipbuilding on the Broadkill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 12, 2010
1. Shipbuilding on the Broadkill Marker
Inscription. Like the Native Americans before them, the European settlers of the 17th and 18th centuries utilized the Broadkill River as a means of transportation. Clearing of lands resulted in an abundance of grain and wood products. To transport these products to market, local craftsmen fashioned small vessels from the timbers of the prime hardwood forest that covered the land. Expanding settlement and the resulting increase of exports led to the construction of larger vessels capable of sailing to more-distant ports. As the number and size of these vessels increased, the reputation of local builders began to grow as well.
Located at the highest point of navigation, the tiny village of Milton offered the advantage of proximity to the inland forests, and by the early 1800s a majority of the shipyards were located here. While earlier vessels had been built for local commerce, the Broadkill industry’s reputation for quality fueled a demand for ships by outside interests. The size of vessels grew steadily, and local shipwrights were routinely producing ships for the coastal and Trans-Atlantic trade by the mid-19th century. Increasing preference for steam-driven ships, the physical limitations of the river, and the lack of quality timber, resulted in the rapid decline of the industry in the 1890s. By the dawn of the 20th century the Broadkill’s
Shipbuilding on the Broadkill Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 12, 2010
2. Shipbuilding on the Broadkill Marker
“golden age” as a center for shipbuilding was over.
 
Erected 2001 by The Delaware Public Archives. (Marker Number SC-143.)
 
Location. 38° 46.725′ N, 75° 18.615′ W. Marker is in Milton, Delaware, in Sussex County. Marker is on Chandler Street, on the right when traveling east. Click for map. Located in Milton Memorial Park at the Broadkill River foot bridge and landing, behind the library. Marker is in this post office area: Milton DE 19968, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Ships and Men (a few steps from this marker); The Holly Industry (within shouting distance of this marker); Milton Public Library (within shouting distance of this marker); Governor David Hazzard (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Milton Museum (about 400 feet away); Governor Samuel Paynter (about 500 feet away); Milton Fire Department, Inc. (about 600 feet away); Carey Storehouse (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Milton.
 
Regarding Shipbuilding on the Broadkill. Originally settled in 1672, it was once known as "Head of the Broadkill" for its geographic location at the head of the Broadkill River. This location, just a few miles from Delaware Bay
Shipbuilding on the Broadkill Marker seen along Mitlton Memorial Park Driveway, off Chandler Street image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 12, 2010
3. Shipbuilding on the Broadkill Marker seen along Mitlton Memorial Park Driveway, off Chandler Street
and Atlantic Ocean, was ideal for shipbuilding in days of old. Many shipbuilders and sea captains lived and worked in Milton
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
Shipbuilding on the Broadkill Marker, (l), shares location with Ships and Men Marker (r) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, October 12, 2010
4. Shipbuilding on the Broadkill Marker, (l), shares location with Ships and Men Marker (r)
Footbridge in Milton Memorial Park, across the Broadkill River
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 517 times since then and 13 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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