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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Selma in Dallas County, Alabama — The American South (East South Central)
 

The Selma Movement

(The Beginning) / (The Prize)

 
 
The Selma Movement Marker (The Beginning) image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
1. The Selma Movement Marker (The Beginning)
Inscription.
[Side A:]
(The Beginning)
The major civil rights protest, which focused national attention on the issue of racial discrimination in voting & led to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, was centered in Selma.

In January of 1963 local citizens organized a voter registration class & by February others were in Selma to assist with registration. Local law officials & blacks seeking to register to vote soon clashed & this received widespread news coverage.

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. came to Selma in January of 1965 to lead the drive to vote. This began the marches to the Dallas County Courthouse, the great number of arrests, the ensuing violence, & national media attention on Selma & the issue of voter registration.

[Side B:]
(The Prize)
On Sunday March 7, 1965, 600 people led by Hosea Williams & John Lewis began a march to Montgomery to take their quest for voting rights directly to Governor George C. Wallace. At the Pettus bridge they were met by state troopers who used horses, tear gas & billy clubs to break up the march.

A march on March 9, led by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. met the troopers at the same place & turned around without incident.

The Federal Court ruled the march was legal & with Federal protection
The Selma Movement Marker (The Prize) image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
2. The Selma Movement Marker (The Prize)
4,000 began the march to Montgomery on March 21. Camping along the road the protesters reached 25,000 in number by the time they reached the State Capital on March 25.

National news coverage of these events secured wide-spread support & led to the approval of the Voting Rights Act on August 6, 1865.
 
Erected 1990 by Alabama Historical Commission / City of Selma.
 
Location. Marker has been confirmed missing. It was likely located near 32° 24.384′ N, 87° 1.144′ W. Marker was in Selma, Alabama, in Dallas County. Marker was at the intersection of Broad Street (U.S. 80) and Water Avenue, on the right when traveling north on Broad Street. Click for map. Exact marker location now has a different Civil Rights marker erected. Marker was in this post office area: Selma AL 36701, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this location. 'Bloody Sunday' Attack at Edmund Pettus Bridge / U.S. Congress Approves Voting Rights Act of 1965 (here, next to this marker); Edmund Pettus Bridge (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); This Tablet Commemorates the Visit of Lafayette (about 300 feet away); Water Avenue (about 300 feet away); Site of Selma-Dallas County’s 1st Bridge 1884-1940
Voting Rights Act of 1965 Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, March 25, 2015
3. Voting Rights Act of 1965 Marker
This marker replaces the one shown above.
(about 400 feet away); Ecor Bienville (about 400 feet away); St. James Hotel (about 400 feet away); The Sleeping Prophet (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Selma.
 
Categories. African AmericansCivil Rights
 
Bloody Sunday Attack at Pettus Bridge marker. image. Click for full size.
By Mark Hilton, March 25, 2015
4. Bloody Sunday Attack at Pettus Bridge marker.
This marker replaces the one shown above.
The Selma Movement Marker image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
5. The Selma Movement Marker
The Selma Movement Marker and The Edmund Pettus Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
6. The Selma Movement Marker and The Edmund Pettus Bridge
Looking South from the Edmund Pettus Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
7. Looking South from the Edmund Pettus Bridge
It was here on this side of the bridge where the Alabama State Troopers attacked the Civil Rights Marchers.
North View Of The Edmund Pettus Bridge image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
8. North View Of The Edmund Pettus Bridge
Rev. Hosea Williams, Sr. image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
9. Rev. Hosea Williams, Sr.
Leader of The Selma-Montgomery March
"Bloody Sunday" March 7, 1965

"He Fed the Hungry"
"Unbossed and Unbought"
1926 - 2000
Hon. John Lewis image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
10. Hon. John Lewis
Leader of The Selma-Montgomery March
"Bloody Sunday" March 7, 1965

"Get in the Way"
"When we pray we move our feet"
Amelia Boynton Robinson and Marie Foster image. Click for full size.
By Tim & Renda Carr, November 6, 2010
11. Amelia Boynton Robinson and Marie Foster
The Selma - Montgomery March
"Bloody Sunday", March 7, 1965

Mothers of the Civil Rights Movement
Before and Beyond the Bridge
Didn't let nothing turn them around!
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. This page has been viewed 1,842 times since then and 8 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   3, 4. submitted on , by Mark Hilton of Montgomery, Alabama.   5, 6. submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama.   7, 8, 9, 10, 11. submitted on , by Timothy Carr of Birmingham, Alabama. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on October 8, 2016.
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