Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Elizario in El Paso County, Texas — The American South (West South Central)
 

Salt War

 
 
Salt War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 4, 2010
1. Salt War Marker
Inscription. Resentment over private control of the salt lakes in the region, often called Guadalupe Lakes, in 1877 led to the El Paso Salt War which entailed the loss of many lives and much property.
 
Erected 1936 by The State of Texas. (Marker Number 4501.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Texas 1936 Centennial Markers and Monuments marker series.
 
Location. 31° 35.101′ N, 106° 16.398′ W. Marker is in San Elizario, Texas, in El Paso County. Marker is on San Elizario Road, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1556 San Elizario Road, San Elizario TX 79849, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. San Elizario (here, next to this marker); Los Portales (a few steps from this marker); The First Thanksgiving (within shouting distance of this marker); San Elizario Memorial Plaza (within shouting distance of this marker); The Camino Real (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named San Elizario (within shouting distance
Salt War Marker (on left) image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, November 4, 2010
2. Salt War Marker (on left)
San Elizario Marker is on the right.
of this marker); Juan de Onate Expedition - 1598 (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Salt War (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in San Elizario.
 
Also see . . .  El Paso Salt War. The El Paso Salt War began in the late 1860ís as a struggle between El Paso businessmen W.W. Mills, Albert J. Fountain, and Louis Cardis in an attempt to acquire title to the salt deposits near the base of the Guadalupe Mountains. (Submitted on November 15, 2010, by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona.) 
 
Categories. Natural ResourcesNotable Events
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page has been viewed 310 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement