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Alexandria in Rapides Parish, Louisiana — The American South (West South Central)
 

Red River

 
 
Red River Marker (Side A) image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, November 17, 2010
1. Red River Marker (Side A)
Inscription.
Side A
Twenty-seven miles southeast of Tucumcari, New Mexico, Red River originates in the watershed of the Frio Draw on the Llano Estacado at an elevation of about 5000 feet. Flowing eastward through Palo Duro Canyon, it subsequently forms the border between Texas and Oklahoma, then turns southeast across Louisiana joining the Mississippi River at the northern boundary of the Florida Parishes. Its distinctive red color and rich alluvial valley have been noted since the earliest European explorations in the 17th century. Following the Louisiana Purchase, the U.S. sent the Freeman-Curtis Expedition in 1806, to explore Red River and refute Spanish border claims. The first steamboat, the "Enterprise", ascended the Red River to Alexandria in 1814, but transportation above Natchitoches was blocked by the Great Raft until cleared by Capt. Henry Shreve in 1833-38. (Continued on other side)

Side B
(Continued from other side)
During the Civil War, the Union's Red River Campaign was an important part of the Trans-Mississippi hostilities. The Great Raft gradually reformed but was cleared again in 1873. By the turn of the century, river transportation had succumbed to rail competition and silting due to flood control levees. For almost 100 years, commercial river transportation was non-existent until the Red River
Red River Marker (Side B) image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, November 17, 2010
2. Red River Marker (Side B)
Waterway Project again made it feasible with a system of locks and dams. Lindy Claiborne Boggs Lock and Dam No. 1 at Lower Brouillette was dedicated November 9, 1984; John H. Overton Lock and Dam No. 2 at Ruby was dedicated May 26, 1992. Congress authorized funding for additional locks and dams for navigation to reach Shreveport-Bossier City.
 
Erected by Red River Waterway Commission.
 
Location. 31° 18.745′ N, 92° 26.624′ W. Marker is in Alexandria, Louisiana, in Rapides Parish. Marker can be reached from Murray Street north of Main Street, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is on the levee above the Old Rapides Bank Building/Alexandria Museum. Marker is in this post office area: Alexandria LA 71301, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Old Rapides Bank Building (within shouting distance of this marker); Rapides Parish Governors (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Louisiana Maneuvers (about 400 feet away); Thomas Courtland Manning (about 500 feet away); Alexandria (about 500 feet away); Post-Civil War Alexandria (about 500 feet away); Commercial Building (about 600 feet away); The Hotel Bentley (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Alexandria.
 
Also see . . .
Red River Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, November 17, 2010
3. Red River Marker
On the levee in the background.
 The Great Red River Raft - Ancestry.com by Dennis Muncrief. (Submitted on November 27, 2010, by Bill Pfingsten of Bel Air, Maryland.)
 
Categories. ExplorationIndustry & CommerceWaterways & Vessels
 
Jackson Street/US 165 drawbridge image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, November 17, 2010
4. Jackson Street/US 165 drawbridge
Upstream as seen from the pavilion near the marker.
Pineville Expy/US 167/LA 28 bridge image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, November 17, 2010
5. Pineville Expy/US 167/LA 28 bridge
Downstream as seen from the pavilion near the marker.
River Park orientation sign image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, November 17, 2010
6. River Park orientation sign
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. This page has been viewed 1,060 times since then and 30 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on March 18, 2017.
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