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Roslyn in Kittitas County, Washington — The American West (Northwest)
Roslyn Coal Mining
 
Roslyn Coal Mining Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Paul Crumlish, July 31, 2010
1. Roslyn Coal Mining Marker
 
Inscription. In 1886, Northern Pacific Railroad mining engineers located large seams of coal and the town of Roslyn was founded.
Coal mining, though dirty and dangerous work, attracted large numbers of immigrants to Roslyn – Serbians, Croatians, Poles, Italians, Lithuanians, and others. During an 1888 strike, the Northern Pacific Coal Company brought in hundreds of African Americans as strikebreakers. Despite the rough reception, many made Roslyn their home.
In the first decades of the twentieth century, competition from other mining regions and sources of energy, such as oil, led to a slow decline in coal mining in Roslyn. In 1963, economics forced the closure of the last large commercial mine in the area. Today, four-fifths of the coal deposits remain unmined.
 
Erected by Washington Department of Transportation.
 
Location. 47° 13.347′ N, 120° 59.702′ W. Marker is in Roslyn, Washington, in Kittitas County. Marker is on West Pennsylvania Avenue 0.1 miles west of North 1st Street (Washington Road 903), on the right when traveling west. Click for map. The marker is located next to the Roslyn Museum, in front of the outdoor displays of mining equipment. Marker is at or near this postal address: 203 West Pennsylvania Ave, Roslyn WA 98941, United States of America.
 
Wide view of the Roslyn Coal Mining Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Paul Crumlish, July 31, 2010
2. Wide view of the Roslyn Coal Mining Marker
Located at the Roslyn Museum, the marker is in front of the outdoor display of coal mining equipment.
 

 
Other nearby markers. At least 1 other marker is within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Douglas A. Munro (approx. 2.4 miles away).
 
Regarding Roslyn Coal Mining. In 1978, the Roslyn Historic District was placed on the National Register of Historic Places.


Roslyn National Historic District – Roslyn, Kittitas County was nominated to the Trust’s Most Endangered Historic Properties List for 2010.
The City of Roslyn is a National, State and Local Historic District. Many structures suffer from deferred maintenance and neglect, in some cases resulting in demolition. Furthermore, the Historic District is endangered by the continuing loss of the thousands of acres of forested perimeter surrounding the town. Sales of forest land to private investors and development companies have already affected Roslyn’s historic resources. Without consideration to the town’s historic core, additional development, if unchecked, may continue to erode the historic fabric that makes Roslyn one of Washington’s truly unique and significant historic centers.
 
Also see . . .
1. Roslyn Museum. The museum is a reflection of Roslyn, a richly seasoned ethnic mix that once represented more than 20 nationalities. Coal became the common denominator looming larger than language barriers or culture. The result was a way of life unique to company towns. (Submitted on November 26, 2010, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.) 
 
Coal Mining Train Photo, Click for full size
By Paul Crumlish, July 31, 2010
3. Coal Mining Train
A steam-powered locomotive at head of the train with coal cars, now at the Roslyn Museum.
 

2. Preserve America Community: Roslyn, Washington. (Submitted on November 26, 2010, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.)
3. Northern Exposure (TV Series 1990 - 1995) - IMDb. After the coal mines closed, the former coal company town had a second life as the location for the exterior filming of Northern Exposure. Still today (2010) tourists visit to see the locations of the fictional town of 'Cicely'. (Submitted on November 26, 2010, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.) 
 
Artifacts of Roslyn's King Coal past Photo, Click for full size
By Paul Crumlish, July 31, 2010
4. Artifacts of Roslyn's King Coal past
Fully loaded with coal and tailing, the cars are part of the coal train on display at the Roslyn Museum.
 
 
Artifacts of Roslyn's King Coal past Photo, Click for full size
By Paul Crumlish, July 31, 2010
5. Artifacts of Roslyn's King Coal past
The mucker was used to clear and load loose rock at mine entrances.
 
 
Artifacts of Roslyn's King Coal past Photo, Click for full size
By Paul Crumlish, July 31, 2010
6. Artifacts of Roslyn's King Coal past
The portable water pump was used to keep the mines from flooding with ground water.
 
 
Artifacts of Roslyn's King Coal past Photo, Click for full size
By Paul Crumlish, July 31, 2010
7. Artifacts of Roslyn's King Coal past
The Bull Wheel was put at the top of the tailings pile to haul the rock car up to the top of the dump by a cable and a hoist. The cable is hooked the hoist at the bottom of the pile and threaded through the Bull Wheel at the top pulling the rock car up dumping it’s load rock out.
 
 
Artifacts of Roslyn's King Coal past Photo, Click for full size
By Paul Crumlish, July 31, 2010
8. Artifacts of Roslyn's King Coal past
Sullivan Ironclad Continuous Coal Cutters were used to undercut the coal so it can blasted from the vein and loaded into coal cars.
 
 
Kerstetter Cabin (1932) Photo, Click for full size
By Paul Crumlish, July 31, 2010
9. Kerstetter Cabin (1932)
Built by one of the first forest rangers in the Wenatchee Forest, it was originally located near Iron Creek and moved to the Roslyn Museum in 1977.
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on November 26, 2010, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,234 times since then. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on November 26, 2010, by PaulwC3 of Northern, Virginia.
 
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