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Lewes in Sussex County, Delaware — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

The Bombardment of Lewes

 
 
The Bombardment of Lewes Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. The Bombardment of Lewes Marker
Inscription.
This stone is to
commemorate the
Bombardment of Lewes
by the British
April 6th and 7th 1813.
Placed by the
National Society U.S.
Daughters of 1812
State of Delaware
1914

 
Erected 1914 by National Society U.S. Daughters of 1812 in the State of Delaware.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United States Daughters of 1812 marker series.
 
Location. 38° 46.553′ N, 75° 8.335′ W. Marker is in Lewes, Delaware, in Sussex County. Marker is on Front Street, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Located between Neils Alley and Bank Street at 1812 Memorial Park. Marker is in this post office area: Lewes DE 19958, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The War of 1812 (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named The Bombardment of Lewes (a few steps from this marker); Otis H. Smith City Dock (a few steps from this marker); The Cannonball House (within shouting distance of this marker); The Explorations of Giovanni da Verrazzano
The Bombardment of Lewes Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
2. The Bombardment of Lewes Marker
(within shouting distance of this marker); Lewes-Rehoboth Canal (within shouting distance of this marker); Dodds Corner (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Lewes (about 300 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Lewes.
 
Regarding The Bombardment of Lewes. In March of 1813, the Royal Navy established a blockade of the Delaware Bay and River. The British squadron, under the command of Commodore John P. Beresford, RN, took up stations off Lewes and the Delaware Capes, and began to conduct raids along the coast in an effort to disrupt maritime commerce and shipping. Many small actions resulted with numerous vessels being captured and destroyed. On this location was one of two fortifications that were built to protect the town of Lewes. These earthworks mounted several cannon, and were manned by militia under the command of Colonel Samuel Boyer Davis. After Delaware authorities refused a demand to provide supplies, the British ships took up bombardment positions off the town. From April 6th into the 7th, Lewes was shelled for twenty-two hours, with the British firing as many as 800 projectiles into the town. This was the first use of the Congreve rocket against
The Bombardment of Lewes Marker, seen along Front Street, at 1812 Memorial Park. image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
3. The Bombardment of Lewes Marker, seen along Front Street, at 1812 Memorial Park.
the Americans during the War of 1812. Naval fire was successful in striking and damaging the fortifications and many buildings in the town. Although short of ammunition, the American batteries were able to effectively reply and cause damage to enemy vessels. On April 7th the British withdrew to more distant positions. They continued to maintain the blockade until 1815.(The Delaware Public Archives)
 
Also see . . .
1. Col. Samuel Boyer Davis, by Hazel D. Brittingham. "... Commanding the defense of the town was a native, Samuel Boyer Davis, who was wounded during the attack. ..." (Submitted on December 1, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. Military and Maritime History: The Port of Lewes. by Hazel D. Brittingham. The War of 1812 brought personal wartime involvement to the populace of Lewes. The opening salvos of an account of the activity at the local coastal area, by this writer and published earlier, state: Cannonballs and Congreve rockets shattered the calm of coast and countryside on April 6-7, 1813, during America's "second war for Independence." The War of 1812 washed ashore at little Lewistown on Delaware Bay when for a dramatic 22-hour period there was an exchange of cannonballs. Among the British warships in the bay were the 74-gun Poictiers and the 36-gun Belvidera. The British needed food and water. Their requests, including the offer to pay for the provisions at Philadelphia
The Bombardment of Lewes Memorial Cannon in the 1812 Park image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
4. The Bombardment of Lewes Memorial Cannon in the 1812 Park
prices, were denied by the spunky Americans, and the enemy attacked the town by cannonade. Although there was no loss of life and little property damage, it took great courage for the defenders led by a native, Colonel Samuel Boyer Davis, to retort under such odds. Cannon facing seaward today and the Cannonball House- Marine Museum, in the vicinity of the post office on Front Street, are reminders of the brave stand. (Submitted on December 1, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. War of 1812
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 788 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   4. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on December 12, 2016.
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