Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hartford in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Marquis De La Fayette

 
 
Marqui De La Fayette Plaque/Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, March 24, 2007
1. Marqui De La Fayette Plaque/Marker
Inscription. To the Marquis De La Fayette, born September 6, 1757, died May 20, 1834.

A true friend of Liberty, who served as a Major General in the Continental Army with “all possible zeal, without any special pay or allowances” until the American colonists secured their freedom, and whose frequent visits to this State, as Aide to Washington, as Liaison Officer with supporting French troops, and in the pursuit of freedom, are gratefully remembered.

This Plaque is dedicated by the Connecticut La Fayette Bicentennial Committee in the Bicentennial Year of the birth of this great Frenchman, September 21, 1957.
 
Erected 1957 by Connecticut La Fayette Bicentennial Committee.
 
Location. 41° 45.746′ N, 72° 40.911′ W. Marker is in Hartford, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is at the intersection of Capitol Avenue and Washington and Lafayette Streets, in the median on Capitol Avenue
Marquis De La Fayette Marker in front of State Office Building image. Click for full size.
By Sandra Hughes, September 11, 2012
2. Marquis De La Fayette Marker in front of State Office Building
. Click for map. Monument is across the street from the state capitol building. Marker is in this post office area: Hartford CT 06106, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. 1st Connecticut Heavy Artillery (within shouting distance of this marker); Columbus (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Confucius (about 400 feet away); Col. Thomas Knowlton (about 600 feet away); Trinity College (about 600 feet away); Joseph Roswell Hawley (about 700 feet away); Andersonville Boy (about 700 feet away); Orville Hitchcock Platt (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Hartford.
 
Also see . . .  Wikipedia Entry for Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de Lafayette. “After Lafayette offered to serve without pay, Congress commissioned him a major general on 31 July 1777. Lafayette’s advocates included the recently arrived American envoy to France, Benjamin Franklin, who by letter urged Congress to accommodate
Satue of the Marquis De La Fayette astride his horse image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 24, 2007
3. Satue of the Marquis De La Fayette astride his horse
1932 Bronze by Paul Wayland Hartlett (1865-1925) is approx 12 feet high on a 10 foot base.
the young Frenchman. General George Washington, commander in chief of the Continental Army, came to Philadelphia to brief Congress on military affairs. Lafayette met him at a dinner on 5 August 1777; according to Marc Leepson, ‘the two men bonded almost immediately.’ Washington was impressed by the young man’s enthusiasm and was inclined to think well of a fellow Mason; Lafayette was simply in awe of the commanding general. General Washington took the Frenchman to view his military camp; when Washington expressed embarrassment at its state and that of the troops, Lafayette responded, ‘I am here to learn, not to teach’.” (Submitted on July 30, 2016.) 
 
Additional comments.
1. About the Statue
“The sculpture is a replica of the Lafayette sculpture outside the Louvre, in Paris. After completion of the Paris sculpture, the artist, Paul Wayland Hartlett, gave the plaster model to the State of Connecticut, where it was placed in the State Capitol.
Statue of La Fayette above the plaque image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, April 24, 2007
4. Statue of La Fayette above the plaque
In 1930, Frances B. Storrs donated $20,000 to make a bronze cast for the City of Hartford. The casting and dedication took place in 1932.”

There is a small turtle under the horse’s left rear hoof. “The meaning of the turtle is not known, but it reportedly may allude to the lack of speed in which the artist was paid, or the slow progress the artist made toward completion of the work.” The original plaster of the statue was completed in 1907 but it was not cast until 1932.

“The sculpture was originally placed at the intersection of Washington Street and Capitol Avenue, but in 1979 it was moved to facilitate traffic patterns. ” —From the Art Inventories Catalog of the Smithsonian Institution Research Information System
    — Submitted November 30, 2007.

 
Additional keywords. Lafayette Harford Revolution Washington
 
Categories. War, US Revolutionary
 
General the Marquis de Lafayette image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, September 5, 2015
5. General the Marquis de Lafayette
This portrait of Lafayette by an unknown American Artist hangs in the Museum of the Historical Society of Maryland in Baltimore.
La Fayette Statue image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, February 1, 2012
6. La Fayette Statue
The Turtle Near the Horse's Left Hoof image. Click for full size.
By Michael Herrick, February 1, 2012
7. The Turtle Near the Horse's Left Hoof
The Legend of the Turtle
After sculptor Paul Bartlett had completed the statue of LaFayette, he waited a long time for the city to mount the statue on a pedestal. It took so long, that he became frustrated and added the small turtle to the statue to show how slowly he thought the project was going. It is told that the city got the message and the work was completed shortly afterwards. But the turtle stayed.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 3,158 times since then and 34 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   2. submitted on , by Sandra Hughes of Killen, Usa.   3, 4. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   5. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland.   6, 7. submitted on , by Michael Herrick of Southbury, Connecticut. • J. J. Prats was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on July 30, 2016.
Paid Advertisement