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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Harrisonburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Woodbine Cemetery

The Soldiers’ Section

 
 
Woodbine Cemetery CWT Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, December 27, 2010
1. Woodbine Cemetery CWT Marker
Inscription. During the Civil War, Woodbine Cemetery was Harrisonburg’s principal burial ground. Chartered in March 1850, it opened later that year after the city’s first mayor, Isaac Hardesty, sold 2.5 acres of his property to the cemetery company. The need for additional grave sites for fallen soldiers became clear early in the conflict. Nearby engagements, such as the action in which Confederate Gen. Turner Ashby was killed on June 6, 1862, as well as the Battles of Cross Keys and Port Republic, created fatalities that began to fill the available space. The deaths of wounded soldiers treated at Harrisonburg’s general military hospital after it was established in October 1862 prompted city merchant Samuel Shacklett to donate an adjoining acre for a soldiers’ cemetery.

After the war, Mrs. Juliet Lyle Strayer formed the Ladies’ Memorial Association in June 1868 to tend the graves. Remains buried in Woodbine Cemetery were removed to the Soldiers’ Section, as were those interred elsewhere in Rockingham County. Eventually, about 250 Confederate soldiers, including men from Virginia, Maryland, North and South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, Alabama, Louisiana, and Missouri were buried here. Most are unknown. At first wooden headboards marked the raves, but in 1899, the Ladies’ Memorial Association and the Turner Ashby Chapter of the United Daughters
Woodbine Cemetery Confederate Monument Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, December 27, 2010
2. Woodbine Cemetery Confederate Monument
of the Confederacy replaced them with marble markers.

In 1876, as the United States celebrated the nation’s Centennial, the Ladies’ Memorial Association erected a 23-foot-high monument here. Praise of the men’s service and a list of battles in the Shenandoah Valley are inscribed on the marble base.
 
Erected 2010 by Virginia Civil War Trails and Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the United Daughters of the Confederacy, and the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 26.892′ N, 78° 51.738′ W. Marker is in Harrisonburg, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of East Market Street (U.S. 33) and Reservoir Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Harrisonburg VA 22801, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Confederate Monument (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named The Woodbine Cemetery (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Edgar Amos Love (approx. 0.4 miles away); McNeill’s Rangers (approx. 0.4 miles away); Harrisonburg (approx. 0.4 miles away); Court Square & Springhouse
Woodbine Cemetery Soldiers' Section Photo, Click for full size
By Bernard Fisher, December 27, 2010
3. Woodbine Cemetery Soldiers' Section
(approx. 0.4 miles away); Hardesty-Higgins House (approx. 0.4 miles away); The Big Spring (approx. 0.4 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Harrisonburg.
 
More about this marker. On the top are two pictures of “Woodbine Cemetery, 1920” – Courtesy Dale MacAllister

On the lower left is a "You Are Here" map of downtown Harrisonburg.

On the lower right is a sketch with the caption, “Burying dead soldiers and burning dead horses after a battle, 1862” Courtesy Library of Congress
 
Also see . . .
1. Civil War Trails in Harrisonburg & Rockingham County. (Submitted on December 28, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
2. Virginia Civil War Trails - Harrisonburg and area. Civil War Traveler (Submitted on December 28, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 

3. Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation. (Submitted on December 28, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
...after The Battle, Burying The Dead--and Burning The Horses... Photo, Click for full size
By Alfred R. Waud, June 3, 1862
4. ...after The Battle, Burying The Dead--and Burning The Horses...
Library of Congress [LC-DIG-ppmsca- 21382]
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,076 times since then and 76 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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