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North Charleston in Charleston County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Jenkins Orphanage

 
 
Jenkins Orphanage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
1. Jenkins Orphanage Marker
Inscription. (Front text)
Since 1937 this has been the campus of the Jenkins Orphanage, established in Charleston in 1891 by Rev. Daniel Joseph Jenkins (1862-1937). Jenkins, a Baptist minister, founded this orphanage for African American children with aid from the city. Housed in the old Marine Hospital on Franklin Street downtown 1891-1937, it also included an institute to teach and train children between the ages of 3 and 20. More than 500 lived there by 1896.
(Reverse text)
The Jenkins Orphanage Band played concerts across the U.S. and Europe for more than 30 years to help fund the orphanage. The band, taught by Hatsie Logan and Eugene Mikell, is prominent in the early history of jazz; alumni Cat Anderson, Freddie Green, and Jabbo Smith played for Duke Ellington, Count Basie, and others. The orphanage moved here in 1937, and its offices and dorms were built by the City of Charleston. Those historic buildings burned in the 1980s.
 
Erected 2008 by The Daniel Joseph Jenkins Institute for Children, a program of the Orphan Aid Society, Inc. (Marker Number 10-57.)
 
Location. 32° 50.816′ N, 79° 59.788′ W. Marker is in North Charleston, South Carolina, in Charleston County. Marker is on Azalea
Jenkins Orphanage Marker, reverse side image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
2. Jenkins Orphanage Marker, reverse side
Drive (State Highway 10-894), on the left when traveling west. Click for map. opposite Bonds Avenue. Marker is at or near this postal address: 3923 Azalea Drive, North Charleston SC 29405, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Charleston Naval Hospital Historic District (approx. 1.8 miles away); Charleston Navy Yard Historic District (approx. 1.9 miles away); Charleston Naval Yard Officers' Quarters Historic District (approx. 2.2 miles away); The Navy Base (approx. 2.3 miles away); Liberty Hill (approx. 2.3 miles away); Greater Charleston Naval Base Memorial (approx. 2.3 miles away); Greyhounds Of The Fleet (approx. 2.3 miles away); The Gator Navy (approx. 2.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in North Charleston.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Daniel Joseph Jenkins Institute for Children, previously known as Jenkins Orphanage,. ... The Orphange was chartered in July of 1892 by the State of South Carolina with the mission of providing a safe, secure, loving home environment for orphans and destitute boys and girls in need. ... (Submitted on December 28, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 

2. The Jenkins Orphanage, Wikipedia entry. The Jenkins Orphanage Band, wearing discarded Citadel uniforms, performed throughout the United States
Jenkins Orphanage Marker, looking west along Azalea Drive image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
3. Jenkins Orphanage Marker, looking west along Azalea Drive
and even toured England raising money for the support of the orphanage. It played in inaugural parades of Presidents Theodore Roosevelt and William Taft. ... (Submitted on December 28, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansEducationEntertainment
 
Jenkins Orphanage Marker, looking east on Azalea Drive (State Road 10-894) image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
4. Jenkins Orphanage Marker, looking east on Azalea Drive (State Road 10-894)
Driveway for Institute seen in background
Jenkins Orphanage gatehouse image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2010
5. Jenkins Orphanage gatehouse
Jenkins Orphanage image. Click for more information.
By Mike Stroud, October 6, 2011
6. Jenkins Orphanage
The Bell of Hope image. Click for full size.
By Ann Bomgren, circa 2009
7. The Bell of Hope
The Bell of Hope was once used to tell residents and employees of the Jenkins Orphanage it was time to gather together. Unfortunately, a major fire in the late 1980s destroyed the administration building, several dorms, and this bell. The bell was found in the ashes and restored. Because of its resilience, it was nicknamed the ” Bell of Hope.” It stands near the new administration building.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 667 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   6. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   7. submitted on , by Ann Bomgren of Charleston, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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