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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Grand Canyon National Park in Coconino County, Arizona — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Bright Angel Trail

 
 
Bright Angel Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 11, 2010
1. Bright Angel Trail Marker
Inscription.
Each year thousands of hikers enter Grand Canyon on the Bright Angel Trail. They follow a tradition - and a trail route - established by prehistoric people. For centuries humans have used this route for two key reasons: water and access. Water emerges from springs at Indian Garden, and erosion along the Bright Angel Fault creates a break in the cliffs, providing access to the springs.

When prospectors arrived here in the late 1800s, Havasupai Indians were using the route. Prospectors improved the Havasupai route, but soon realized that the canyon's wealth lay in tourism, not ore. By 1903 one prospector, Ralph Cameron, had secured control of the trail by strategically locating mining claims. He then charged a $1.00 toll per trail user.

For years Ralph Cameron battled to defend his precarious legal claim to the Bright Angel Trail, all the while collecting tolls. In 1928 the National Park Service gained control of the trail and tolls ceased. The Bright Angel has been Grand Canyon's most popular trail ever since.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 36° 3.437′ N, 112° 8.627′ W. Marker is in Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, in Coconino County. Click for map. Marker is near the
Bright Angel Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 11, 2010
2. Bright Angel Trail Marker
mule corral, along the South Rim walkway, about 750 feet west of Bright Angel Lodge, off Village Loop Drive in Grand Canyon Village. Marker is in this post office area: Grand Canyon AZ 86023, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Mules and the Canyon (here, next to this marker); Grand Canyon Village (within shouting distance of this marker); Kolb Studio (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Historic Kolb Studio (about 500 feet away); Buckey O'Neill Cabin (approx. 0.2 miles away); Lookout Studio (approx. 0.2 miles away); Bright Angel Lodge (approx. 0.2 miles away); a different marker also named Bright Angel Lodge (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Grand Canyon National Park.
 
Also see . . .
1. Bright Angel Trail. (Submitted on January 8, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. Bright Angel Trail Day Hike. (Submitted on January 8, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
3. Trail View Overlook Audio Tour Transcript. (Submitted on January 8, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. EnvironmentExplorationNative AmericansRoads & Vehicles
 
Photo on Bright Angel Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
3. Photo on Bright Angel Trail Marker
[Caption reads] Pictographs, like these found near the head of the Bright Angel Trail, and other archaeological evidence attest to the use of the trail route by prehistoric and historic Indians.
Photo on Bright Angel Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
1915
4. Photo on Bright Angel Trail Marker
[Caption reads] Ralph Cameron, circa 1915.
Photo on Bright Angel Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
1927
5. Photo on Bright Angel Trail Marker
[Caption reads] A typical Bright Angel Trail mule ride, 1927, photographed from Kolb Studio. The tradition of Bright Angel Trail mule rides continues today.
Photo on Bright Angel Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
1910
6. Photo on Bright Angel Trail Marker
[Caption reads] Indian Garden around 1910, during the time of Ralph Cameron's control.
Photo on Bright Angel Trail Marker image. Click for full size.
7. Photo on Bright Angel Trail Marker
[Caption reads] Cameron's Bright Angel Trail toll gate. Cameron once boasted that he "would make more money out of the Grand Canyon than any other man." For more than 20 years Cameron collected tolls on the Bright Angel Trail.
Bright Angel Trail Cutout image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., November 11, 2010
8. Bright Angel Trail Cutout
Bright Angel Trail image. Click for full size.
By Bill Kirchner, August 27, 2008
9. Bright Angel Trail
Mile-and-a-half Resthouse. This is a good turn-a-round for first time and casual hikers. It will take a average hiker 45 to 60 minutes to get this far down the trail, and 1.5 to 2 hours to hike back out.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 849 times since then and 17 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.   9. submitted on , by Bill Kirchner of Tucson, Arizona. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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