“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Cambridge in Dorchester County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)

Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Franklin Delano Roosevelt Marker image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, November 4, 2007
1. Franklin Delano Roosevelt Marker
Inscription. 1954. To the memory of Franklin Delano Roosevelt, a great American. President Roosevelt visited Cambridge on October 26, 1935, to participate in the dedication of the Emerson C. Harrington Bridge. This stack was removed from the U.S.S. Potomac, which carried him on numerous historic occasions. It enclosed the elevator which meant so much to his comfort.
Location. 38° 34.534′ N, 76° 4.306′ W. Marker is in Cambridge, Maryland, in Dorchester County. Marker is on High Street 0.1 miles north of Water Street, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at the end of High Street as it loops back to Water Street. Marker is in this post office area: Cambridge MD 21613, United States of America.
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Long Wharf-The River (here, next to this marker); World War I Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); World War II (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); This Bell (approx. 0.3 miles away); Christ P. E. Church (approx. 0.3 miles away); Finding Freedom (approx. 0.4 miles away); John F. Kennedy (approx. 0.4 miles away); Exploring Dorchester's Fragile Beauty (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Cambridge.
Also see . . .
Stack from the U.S.S. Potomac image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, November 4, 2007
2. Stack from the U.S.S. Potomac
This stack housed the elevator that "meant so much to his comfort". The 1936 Emmerson C. Harrington Bridge that Roosevelt was visiting can barely be seen behind the newer and taller 1987 Frederick C. Malkus, Jr. Bridge.
 Website for the U.S.S. Potomac Association. This site has several period photos of the U.S.S. Potomac and Roosevelt. (Submitted on December 4, 2007, by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.) 
Categories. 20th CenturyIndustry & CommerceNotable PersonsWaterways & Vessels
The Presidential Yacht, U.S.S. Potomac image. Click for full size.
By F. Robby, 1939
3. The Presidential Yacht, U.S.S. Potomac
Photo credit: U.S.S. Potomac Association.
Franklin D. Roosevelt image. Click for full size.
By Allen C. Browne, February 16, 2015
4. Franklin D. Roosevelt
This 1945 Portrait of Franklin D. Roosevelt by Douglas Chandor hangs in the National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC.

“When Franklin Roosevelt began serving in New York's state legislature in 1911, some observers declared him ill-suited to the rough realities of politics. But Roosevelt thrived on those realities; some two decades later, he was advancing from the New York governorship to the presidency.

Taking office against the bleak backdrop of the Great Depression, Roosevelt responded quickly to this economic disaster with a host of regulatory and welfare measures that redefined the government's role in American life. Among conservatives, the new federal involvement in matters traditionally left to the private sector was a betrayal of America's ideals. But in other quarters, Roosevelt's activism inspired an unwavering popularity that led to his election to an unprecedented four terms.

When Roosevelt sat for this portrait in 1945, his presidential concerns had long since shifted to guiding the nation through World War II. This likeness is a study for a larger painting a sketch of which appears at the lower left commemorating Roosevelt's meeting with wartime Allied leaders, Winston Churchill and Joseph Stalin at Yalta.” — National Portrait Gallery
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland. This page has been viewed 1,222 times since then and 60 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by F. Robby of Baltimore, Maryland.   4. submitted on , by Allen C. Browne of Silver Spring, Maryland. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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