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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Lisco in Morrill County, Nebraska — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Narcissa Whitman

 
 
Narcissa Whitman Marker image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Light, June 17, 2007
1. Narcissa Whitman Marker
Inscription. Narcissa Whitman, trail-blazer and martyred missionary, is one of the great heroines of the frontier West. In 1836 she and Eliza Spalding, following the north side of the Platte on horseback, became the first white women to cross the American continent.

The Protestant “Oregon Mission” was composed of Dr. Marcus Whitman, Rev. Henry Spalding, their new brides, and William Gray. They traveled from New York to Otoe Indian Agency (Bellevue, Nebraska), then joined an American Fur Company caravan led by Thomas Fitzpatrick. From the Green River rendezvous they journeyed westward with traders of the Hudson’s Bay Company. In November, 1847, Narcissa, her husband, and eleven others, were massacred by Cayuse Indians at their Walla Walla mission, now a National Historic Site.

The missionaries passed this point in June 1836. In May, 1847 the Mormon Pioneers passed here en route from Winter Quarters (present North Omaha) to Salt Lake Valley, calling these formations “Ancient Bluff Ruins.” Beginning with the California Gold Rush in 1849 this “Mormon Pioneer Trail” became “the Council Bluffs Road” to emigrants bound for the West Coast.
 
Erected by Oregon-California Trails Association and Nebraska State Historical Society. (Marker Number 296.)
The Mormon Trail preceded US 26 and the Trans-continental Rails lines westward image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Light, July 17, 2007
2. The Mormon Trail preceded US 26 and the Trans-continental Rails lines westward

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the California Trail, the Mormon Pioneer Trail, and the Nebraska State Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 41° 33.408′ N, 102° 43.848′ W. Marker is near Lisco, Nebraska, in Morrill County. Marker is on U.S. 26 7 miles west of Lisco. Click for map. The road is straight and wide open. Keep you eye out for the pull off on the north side of the road. There are no buildings, bluffs, roads or other objects to serve as a guide. Marker is in this post office area: Lisco NE 69148, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 2 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Imaginary Characters…. (approx. 5 miles away); The Mormon Pioneer Trail (approx. 7 miles away).
 
Related marker. Click here for another marker that is related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .
1. Auto Tour Route Interpretive Guide, Nebrasak. This is a detailed guide of the historic trails across Nebraska, including the Mormon Pioneer Trail, the California Trail, the Oregon Trail, and the Pony Express. (Submitted on October 9, 2007, by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana.) 

2. Wai-i-lat-pu Marker. Wai-i-lat-pu, or "The Place of the People of the Rye Grass,” is the mission founded among the Cayuse Indians of the Walla Walla Valley (Washington
"Ancient Bluff Ruins" are in the background image. Click for full size.
By Christopher Light, July 17, 2007
3. "Ancient Bluff Ruins" are in the background
This is open country. The only trees exist right along the river. To the north and south, the land stretches out in rolling plains, until reaching the edge of the valley, where low bluffs reside.
State) by Dr. Marcus Whitman and his wife, Narcissa. It was in Wai-i-lat-pu, on November 29th, 1847, that Narcissa Whitman, her husband, and eleven others, were massacred. (Submitted on November 29, 2007, by Kevin W. of Stafford, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. Notable PersonsRoads & VehiclesSettlements & SettlersWars, US Indian
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana. This page has been viewed 4,287 times since then and 41 times this year. Last updated on , by James R. Kuntz of Warrenton, Missouri. Photos:   1, 2, 3. submitted on , by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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