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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Munfordville in Hart County, Kentucky — The American South (East South Central)
 

Munfordville in the Civil War

 
 
Munfordville in the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
1. Munfordville in the Civil War Marker
Inscription. The small, unassuming county-seat village of Munfordville, founded on an old buffalo crossing and home to a well-known tavern, could claim pride of place in 1860 as the spot where the L&N Railroad crossed the Green River, over what whas then the longest iron bridge in the world. But one year later that asset became a liability - a prize contested by both armies in the Civil War. Within the space of five years, the town saw three separate battles, one of them perhaps the most strategically important in the struggle for Kentucky; a war-long occupation by Union forces that at its height numbered 40,000; the rise of notorious Confederate raider John Hunt Morgan; a town-sized garrison of African-American soldiers and havens on the Underground Railroad; a two home-grown generals, one for each side in the conflict.

The remnants of that time are still visible on the landscape - the railroad bridge still spans Green River on it original pilings. Antebellum architecture still stands in the form of the George Wood House, the Robert and Richard Munford Homes, the F.A. Smith House, the Munfordville Presbyterian Church, the old Village School, and the Old Munford Inn. Across the river, the Battle for the Bridge Historic Preserve protects the battlefields, which a soldier of that conflict would still recognize.

But the most enduring echo
Munfordville in the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
2. Munfordville in the Civil War Marker
of Munfordville's war years is the faces of it people, many of whom are descended from those who endured the struggle that shaped America. Their eyes reflect a community one strengthened by adversity, and now looking toward the future.

Battle of Rowlett's Station, December 17, 1861
Battle and Siege of Munfordville, September 14-17, 1862
Skirmish of Woodsonville, September 20-21, 1862
 
Erected by City of Munfordville in cooperation with Battle fo the Bridge Historic Preserve.
 
Location. 37° 16.293′ N, 85° 53.395′ W. Marker is in Munfordville, Kentucky, in Hart County. Marker is at the intersection of Dixie Highway / Main Street (U.S. 31W) and South Street, on the left when traveling south on Dixie Highway / Main Street. Click for map. Located at the southwest corner of the Hart County courthouse lawn. Marker is in this post office area: Munfordville KY 42765, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A Remarkable Kentucky Family (a few steps from this marker); Hart County (within shouting distance of this marker); Hart County War Memorial (within shouting distance of this marker); Hart County, 1819 (within shouting distance
Munfordville in the Civil War Marker image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
3. Munfordville in the Civil War Marker
The cannon is a replica.
of this marker); William Boone's Grave (within shouting distance of this marker); Carter-Dowling School / Teachers at "Colored" Elementary Schools of Hart County Circa 1950 (within shouting distance of this marker); William Clark and Family (within shouting distance of this marker); Glen Lily (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line). Click for a list of all markers in Munfordville.
 
Categories. African AmericansBridges & ViaductsRailroads & StreetcarsWar, US Civil
 
Munfordville Civil War Monument image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
4. Munfordville Civil War Monument
This monument is dedicated to those how lived, loved, worked, and fought here during the American Civil War, and especially to those who died here, far from home. May they find peace.
Munfordville's two Civil War Generals image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
5. Munfordville's two Civil War Generals
Left: Gen. Thomas Wood, USA
Right: Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner, CSA
Robert Munford House image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
6. Robert Munford House
Also described as the J.T.S. and Elizabeth Brown House. Circa 1828.
George Wood House image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
7. George Wood House
Circa 1834
Richard Munford House image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
8. Richard Munford House
Circa 1830
The Village School image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
9. The Village School
Circa 1833
F.A. (Francis Asberry) Smith House image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
10. F.A. (Francis Asberry) Smith House
Circa 1835
Thomas Munford House image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
11. Thomas Munford House
Circa 1823
Munfordville Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
12. Munfordville Presbyterian Church
circa 1829.
Old Munford Inn image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
13. Old Munford Inn
Circa 1810
Elijah & Ermine Embry Creel House image. Click for full size.
By Lee Hattabaugh, January 25, 2011
14. Elijah & Ermine Embry Creel House
Not listed on the marker, but another antebellum structure, circa 1810.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. This page has been viewed 826 times since then and 28 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on , by Lee Hattabaugh of Capshaw, Alabama. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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