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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hutchinson in Reno County, Kansas — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

The University of Kansas Jayhawk

 
 
The University of Kansas Jayhawk Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 18, 2010
1. The University of Kansas Jayhawk Marker
Inscription.
The University of Kansas is home to a mythical bird with a fascinating history: the Jayhawk. The legendary KU mascot originated in the 1850s border war in Kansas Territory over the question of slavery. No one knows the true origin of the term "Jayhawker," but it came to be applied to those who favored making Kansas a free state. Lawrence, where KU was founded in the aftermath of the Civil War, was a free state stronghold.

The first known connection between KU and the Jayhawk came in 1886, when Professor E.H.S. Bailey incorporated the term into the science club's cheer. This cheer soon evolved into the famous "Rock Chalk, Jayhawk" chant. The song, "I'm a Jayhawk," was written in 1912 by George Bowles, the same year student Henry Maloy drew the first popular depiction of the mascot. Prior to that, the KU's athletic teams had no set mascot.

A total of five versions of the Jayhawk existed in cartoon form prior to 1946, when today's familiar smiling bird was created by student Harold "Hal" Sandy. It is KU's most recognizable symbol, and one of its best investments. Sandy sold the copyright to the Kansas Union Bookstore for $250, a substantial amount of money at the time. Today, it is a popular trademark that earns revenue for KU in support of scholarships and other purposes. On September 12, 1996, a parade down KU's Jayhawk
The University of Kansas Jayhawk Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 18, 2010
2. The University of Kansas Jayhawk Marker
Boulevard honored Hal Sandy on the 50th anniversary of his unique contribution to his alma mater. For more information about the history of KU and its famous mascot, go to www.kuhistory.com
 
Location. 38° 4.599′ N, 97° 55.701′ W. Marker is in Hutchinson, Kansas, in Reno County. Click for map. Marker is on the Kansas State Fairgrounds, just north of the Eisenhower Building. Marker is at or near this postal address: 2000 North Poplar Street, Hutchinson KS 67502, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 2 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. The Legend of Corky the Hornet (here, next to this marker); Victor E. Tiger (a few steps from this marker); Gus Gorilla (a few steps from this marker); Wildcat Evolution (a few steps from this marker); The Story of WuShock (a few steps from this marker); Man's Last Footsteps On The Moon (approx. 0.9 miles away); Citizens Bank (approx. 1.5 miles away); Whiteside Building (approx. 1.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Hutchinson.
 
Also see . . .
1. University of Kansas History. (Submitted on February 2, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
2. University of Kansas. (Submitted on February 2, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
The University of Kansas Jayhawk Marker image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 18, 2010
3. The University of Kansas Jayhawk Marker
At right, in front of car

3. KU Jayhawk and Traditions. (Submitted on February 2, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
4. Kansas State Fair. (Submitted on February 2, 2011, by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania.)
 
Categories. Arts, Letters, MusicEducationSports
 
Original 1912 KU Jayhawk Design on Marker image. Click for full size.
September 18, 2010
4. Original 1912 KU Jayhawk Design on Marker
The University of Kansas Jayhawk Statue image. Click for full size.
By William Fischer, Jr., September 18, 2010
5. The University of Kansas Jayhawk Statue
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 1,892 times since then and 14 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by William Fischer, Jr. of Scranton, Pennsylvania. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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