Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
San Francisco in San Francisco City and County, California — The American West (Pacific Coastal)
 

Hotaling Building

 
 
Hotaling Building Marker image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 18, 2010
1. Hotaling Building Marker
Inscription. Built in 1866 and occupied by A.P. Hotaling & Co., this building housed the largest liquor repository on the West Coast. It survived the 1906 earthquake and fire due to a mile long fire hose laid from Fisherman's Wharf over Telegraph Hill by the U.S. Navy. This prompted the famous doggerel by Charles Field:
"If, as they say, God spanked the town
for being over frisky,
why did he burn the churches down
and save Hotaling's Whiskey?"

 
Erected 1992 by E Clampus Vitus, Yerba Buena Chapter No. 1.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the E Clampus Vitus marker series.
 
Location. 37° 47.786′ N, 122° 24.172′ W. Marker is in San Francisco, California, in San Francisco City and County. Marker is at the intersection of Jackson Street and Hotaling Place on Jackson Street. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 451 Jackson Street, San Francisco CA 94111, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Banking Firm of Pioche et Bayerque (within shouting distance of this marker); Site of the Bank of Lucas, Turner & Co. (within shouting distance of this marker); 56 Gold Street
Hotaling Building Marker - wide view image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 18, 2010
2. Hotaling Building Marker - wide view
The marker is visible just to the right of the lamppost.
(within shouting distance of this marker); First Jewish Religious Services (within shouting distance of this marker); The Salvation Army (within shouting distance of this marker); The Black Cat Café (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Graceful Brick Building (about 300 feet away); The Montgomery Block (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in San Francisco.
 
Also see . . .
1. Historic American Building Survey Record for the Hotaling Building. Includes 3 photos and 9 pages of information on the Hotaling Building.Statement of significance: Begun in 1866, it represents an especially fine example of the rich Italianate buildings of brick, with cast iron facades, which dominated commercial design in the 1860s and 1870s. Its builder was Anson Parsons Hotaling, head of A.P. Hotaling Company, wholesale dealers in siprits and tobacco. After a long and active career as the headquarters of the firm, the building entered a period of gradual decline following the fire of 1906. Its revival to glory, in a form which actually far surpassed the ambition of A.P. Hotaling
Jackson Street View image. Click for full size.
By Roger Sturtevant, April 14, 1934
3. Jackson Street View
This photo, courtesy of Historic American Building Survey (Library of Congress), shows a general view of the south side of Jackson Street in 1934. The Hotaling Building is visible just behind the parked cars. The buildings look much the same today as they did then, albeit with many modernizing touches, as well as additional landscaping.
Company's time, dates from 1952 when the building was acquired by Mr. & Mrs. Henry Lawenda as a center for their wholesale decorative and design firm, Kneedler-Fauchere. This far-sighted and intelligent restoration of a prime group of buildings, on what came to be called Jackson Square (the area east of Montgomery Street), by a group of design and decoration houses, sparked the revival of an historically and architecturally prominent part of San Francisco.
(Submitted on February 9, 2011.) 

2. Old Potrero Single Malt Hotalings Whiskey. Anchor Steam Brewery has produced a single-malt whiskey to commemorate the original Hotaling's. Except, as they note, the famed bit of verse may not have referred to Hotaling's: "Much of the rescued Hotaling's whiskey was bottled and sold under the brand name, 'Old Kirk.' In Charles K. Field's autobiography, 'The Story of Cheerio by Himself,' Field himself recalls the last line of his earthquake poem as having referred to Old Kirk rather than Hotaling's. The Hotaling's version, however—due in part to A.P. Hotaling & Co.'s own post-quake marketing efforts—stuck." (Submitted on February 9, 2011.) 
 
Categories. Disasters
 
The Hotaling Building in 1960 (photo courtesy of the Historic American Buildings Survey) image. Click for full size.
By Jack E. Boucher, October 2, 1960
4. The Hotaling Building in 1960 (photo courtesy of the Historic American Buildings Survey)
The Hotaling Building today image. Click for full size.
By Andrew Ruppenstein, July 18, 2010
5. The Hotaling Building today
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 924 times since then and 3 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Andrew Ruppenstein of Sacramento, California. • Syd Whittle was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement