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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Andersonville in Sumter County, Georgia — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Captain Henry Wirz

1823 - 1865

 
 
Captain Henry Wirz Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, January 24, 2011
1. Captain Henry Wirz Marker
Inscription. Captain Henry Wirz, under the immediate command of Brigadier-General John H. Winder, C.S.A., absent on sick leave, August 1864, commanded the inner prison at Camp Sumter, April 12, 1864 to May 7, 1865. To the best of his ability he tried to obtain food and medicine for Federal prisoners and permitted some to go to Washington in a futile attempt to get prisoners exchanged. He was tried for failure to provide food and medicines for Federals imprisoned here -- though his guards ate the same food -- and mortality was as high among Confederate guards as among prisoners. Of him, Eliza Frances Andrews, Georgia writer, said, “Had he been an angel from heaven, he could not have changed the pitiful tale of privation and hunger unless he had possessed the power to repeat the miracle of the loaves and fishes.” Refusing to implicate others he gave his life for the South, November 10, 1865.
 
Erected 1956 by Georgia Historical Commission. (Marker Number 129-2.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Georgia Historical Society/Commission marker series.
 
Location. 32° 11.75′ N, 84° 8.395′ W. Marker is in Andersonville, Georgia, in Sumter County. Marker is at the intersection of Ellaville
Captain Henry Wirz Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, January 24, 2011
2. Captain Henry Wirz Marker
Street (Georgia Route 228) and Oglethorpe Street, on the right when traveling east on Ellaville Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Andersonville GA 31711, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Andersonville / Father Peter Whelan (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); Wirz Monument (about 500 feet away); Camp Sumter Confederate Prison Site (approx. 0.3 miles away); Star Fort (approx. half a mile away); Stockade Branch (approx. half a mile away); The Commandant's Perspective (approx. half a mile away); The Prison Hospital (approx. half a mile away); World of Lost Spirits (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Andersonville.
 
Regarding Captain Henry Wirz. It is difficult to find a completely balanced account of Captain Wirz's trial and execution, one of only two individuals executed for war crimes following the Civil War. Over time it does seem that the view of Captain Wirz as a war criminal deserving death has softened.
 
Also see . . .  Henry Wirz. The Wikipedia entry for Captain Henry Wirz. (Submitted on February 19, 2011, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Captain Henry Wirz Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, January 24, 2011
3. Captain Henry Wirz Marker
Looking east on Georgia Highway 228, over a railroad overpass toward the site of Camp Sumter, now the Andersonville National Historic Site.
Captain Henry Wirz Marker image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, January 24, 2011
4. Captain Henry Wirz Marker
Looking west on Ellaville Street, Georgia Highway 228, toward the town of Ellaville.
Captain Heinrich Hartmann Wirz image. Click for full size.
Unknown -- from Wikipedia
5. Captain Heinrich Hartmann Wirz
Captain Wirz, born in Switzerland and educated as a doctor, had a medical practice in Louisville, Kentucky prior to the Civil War.
Captain Henry Wirz Monument image. Click for full size.
By David Seibert, January 24, 2011
6. Captain Henry Wirz Monument
Looking south from the site of the marker on Oglethorpe Street toward the monument erected by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in the distance.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. This page has been viewed 1,202 times since then and 22 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by David Seibert of Sandy Springs, Georgia. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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