Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Overton in Clark County, Nevada — The American Mountains (Southwest)
 

Lost City Museum

 
 
Lost City Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, October 2, 2007
1. Lost City Museum Marker
Inscription. This property is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. The Museum was built in 1935 by the Civilian Conservation Corps to display artifacts of prehistoric Native American cultures.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civilian Conservation Corps marker series.
 
Location. 36° 31.887′ N, 114° 26.467′ W. Marker is in Overton, Nevada, in Clark County. Click for map. The marker is located inside the Lost City Museum. There is no admittance fee, however, donations are accepted. Marker is at or near this postal address: 721 S. Moapa Valley Boulevard, Overton NV 89040, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 7 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Fay Perkins, Sr. (here, next to this marker); Pueblo Grande De Nevada (within shouting distance of this marker); Moapa Valley Pioneers (within shouting distance of this marker); Early Settlements in the Moapa Valley (approx. half a mile away); Pioneers (approx. 0.8 miles away); Pueblo Grande de Nevada (approx. 1.2 miles away); Valley of Fire Behind the Camera (approx. 6.2 miles away); Silica Dome (approx. 6.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Overton.
 
Regarding Lost City Museum. The Lost City Museum is
Museum Entrance image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, October 2, 2007
2. Museum Entrance
open to the public. It has an admission fee of $5 for adults age 18+.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Lost City Museum. (Submitted on December 8, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California.)
2. The First 100 Persons Who Shaped Southern Nevada. An account of finding the Lost City in 1924. (Submitted on December 8, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California.) 

3. Wikipedia - Civilian Conservation Corps. (Submitted on December 8, 2007, by Karen Key of Sacramento, California.)
 
Categories. Charity & Public WorkNative AmericansNotable Buildings
 
Museum Entrance - Closeup of Sign image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, October 2, 2007
3. Museum Entrance - Closeup of Sign
Pueblo Grande de Nevada

Existing today as a 30 mile-long series of adobe ruins, this "Lost City" was once the home of an ancient Anasazi Indian civilization. Beginning with the basket makers (300 B.C.-A.D.700) & followed by the the pueblos (A.D.700-1150) this valley was inhabited by a sedentary population of Anasazi farmers. They grew corn beans, squash and cotton on the valley floor (the high ground was used for housing) watered by the Muddy River which sources at Warm Springs, 25 miles north of here. Living in pithouses and later multi-room adobe pueblos, these people maintained a rich culture as manifest by archaeological records they left behind. The Lost City Museum was built in 1935 to preserve the remains of this great civilization which suddenly disappeared CA. A.D.1150, possibly due to severe, widespread drought.
Lost City Museum
Anasazi Pueblos (located behind museum) image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, October 2, 2007
4. Anasazi Pueblos (located behind museum)
These pueblo houses and storage units were reconstructed upon prehistoric foundations excavated by the C.C.C. in 1935.
Building a Museum image. Click for full size.
By Karen Key, October 2, 2007
5. Building a Museum
Part of the CCC work assignment was to build a museum so visitors could view the artifacts. $5,900 was allocated by congress for construction. M.R. Harrington designed the museum, ad with the CCC crews providing the labor, construction began in 1934. Local material was used to make sun dried adobe brick and stone was collected in the Valley of Fire for the floors. Even before the walls were complete the sign was hung with original museum name: Boulder Dam Park Museum.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Karen Key of Sacramento, California. This page has been viewed 1,485 times since then and 2 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Karen Key of Sacramento, California. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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