Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Avella in Washington County, Pennsylvania — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Meadowcroft Rockshelter

 
 
Meadowcroft Rockshelter Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, February 20, 2011
1. Meadowcroft Rockshelter Marker
Inscription. A deeply stratified archaeological site, its deposits span nearly 16,000 years. Discovered in 1973 by Albert Miller and excavated by University of Pittsburgh archaeologists. Meadowcroft revealed North America's earliest known evidence of human presence and the the New World's longest sequence of human occupation. All of eastern North America's major cultural stages appear in its remarkably complete archaeological record.
 
Erected 1999 by Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
 
Location. 40° 17.176′ N, 80° 29.521′ W. Marker is near Avella, Pennsylvania, in Washington County. Marker is on Meadowcroft Road just from Miller Road, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Avella PA 15312, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Independence Community Honor Roll (approx. 2.4 miles away); Doddridge's Fort (approx. 2.8 miles away); Drovers Inn (approx. 3.4 miles away in West Virginia); Ralston Thresher (approx. 4.5 miles away); Grimes Golden Apple (approx. 4.5 miles
Meadowcroft Rockshelter & Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, February 20, 2011
2. Meadowcroft Rockshelter & Marker
away in West Virginia); Mt. Hope United Presbyterian Church (approx. 4.7 miles away); Cross Creek Church (approx. 5.2 miles away); St. John's Episcopal Church (approx. 5.3 miles away in West Virginia).
 
Also see . . .
1. Meadowcroft Rockshelter - Behind the Marker. ExplorePAHistory.com (Submitted on July 13, 2011, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.) 

2. Heinz History Center - Meadowcroft. This National Historic Landmark, located in Avella, Washington County, Pa., features a massive, 16,000-year-old rock overhang used by our earliest ancestors for shelter. (Submitted on January 18, 2012, by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.) 
 
Categories. Native AmericansNatural Features
 
Meadowcroft Rockshelter Initial Excavation image. Click for full size.
By Unknown, 1973
3. Meadowcroft Rockshelter Initial Excavation
Archeologists dug the initial excavation trench at Meadowcroft Rockshelter, seen in this photograph from the early 1970s, to assess the nature of soils and the cultural deposits located both inside and outside the rockshelter's roofline. Dr. J. M. Adovasio, Mercyhurst Archaeological Institute.
PHMC Declares Meadowcroft Rockshelter A Commonwealth Treasure Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Wintermantel, February 20, 2011
4. PHMC Declares Meadowcroft Rockshelter A Commonwealth Treasure Marker
Miller lanceolate speartip and other artifacts from the Meadowcroft Rockshelter image. Click for full size.
By Unknown
5. Miller lanceolate speartip and other artifacts from the Meadowcroft Rockshelter
The Miller lanceolate speartip, named in honor of Albert Miller, who discovered the Meadowcroft Rockshelter site, was found in a soil layer that dates to the period 17,000-9,000 BC. Unlike many Clovis-style spearpoints, the Miller example is not fluted. Its careful flaking, however, exhibits a high degree of craftsmanship. The point's discovery demonstrates that early Paleo-Indians made both fluted and unfluted points. Dr. J. M. Adovasio, Mercyhurst Archaeological Institute.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. This page has been viewed 773 times since then and 6 times this year. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   3. submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   4. submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.   5. submitted on , by Mike Wintermantel of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
Paid Advertisement