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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Keedysville in Washington County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Army Headquarters

 
 
Army Headquarters Marker image. Click for full size.
February 21, 2011
1. Army Headquarters Marker
Inscription. Gen. George McClellan used the Pry House as the headquarters for the Union Army of the Potomac. Officers brought some of the Pry furniture out on the lawn. There eyewitnesses described a “small redan built of fence rails” with telescopes mounted, and how the commander “stood in a soldierly attitude intently watching the battle.” Reporter Charles Coffin rode to “the large square mansion of Mr. Pry” where “the general was sitting in an arm chair.. his staff were about him, their horses saddled and bridled, were hitched to the trees and fences.” When President Lincoln visited in October, Gen. McClellan brought him to the Pry house to see the former headquarters site.

Signal Station
Positioned on high ground, using flags or torches waving back and forth to “talk” to each other, both armies used this new signal technology that permitted rapid communication across the battlefield. Two of their most important signal stations were here at the Pry House (headquarters station) and on Elk Ridge (mountain station), the high ground over a mile to the east. The Manual of Signals stated that with a 12-foot staff and 4-foot flag, signals “are easily read at a distance of 8 miles.”

Field Hospital
After the battle, the Antietam Valley was described
Army Headquarters Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 13, 2013
2. Army Headquarters Marker
McClellan's headquarters, the Pry House, can be seen behind the marker.
as “one vast hospital.” With more than 18,000 soldiers wounded in the two armies, over one hundred field hospitals were established in houses, barns, churches, and tents. Some operated briefly; others housed the sick and suffering for months. The Pry family home and barn were used to care for the wounded, primarily from the Union Second Corps. Gen. Joseph Hooker was brought to the house briefly after being wounded near the Cornfield before being transferred to Washington, D.C.
 
Erected by Antietam National Battlefield - National Park Service - U.S. Department of the Interior.
 
Location. 39° 28.552′ N, 77° 42.819′ W. Marker is near Keedysville, Maryland, in Washington County. Marker can be reached from Shepherdstown Pike (Maryland Route 34). Click for map. Marker is located at the Pry House Field Hospital Museum. Marker is at or near this postal address: 18906 Shepherdstown Pike, Keedysville MD 21756, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Pry Family Upheaval (here, next to this marker); Second Army Corps (approx. ¼ mile away); Humphreys' Division, Fifth Army Corps (approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing); Morell's Division, Fifth Army Corps
Army Headquarters Marker image. Click for full size.
February 21, 2011
3. Army Headquarters Marker
The left of two NPS markers at the Pry House.
(approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing); Fifth Army Corps (approx. half a mile away); a different marker also named Second Army Corps (approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing); Richardson's Division, Second Army Corps (approx. half a mile away but has been reported missing); Pry’s Mill Bridge (approx. 0.6 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Keedysville.
 
More about this marker. The left side of the marker has a photograph of Gen. George McClellan and President. Abraham Lincoln. The center of the marker displays an Historic map of signal stations and troop positions and a Photograph of a Union signal station. The right side of the marker has a photograph of A surgeon’s tourniquet, bone saw and amputation knife and two portraits captioned: Gen. Israel Richardson was wounded while leading his division at Bloody Lane. His wife and sister cared for him in the upstairs bedroom for over a month before he finally succumbed to his wounds on November 3. During his visit in October, President Lincoln made a point to visit Richardson.and Dr. Jonathon Letterman was the medical director
The Pry Farm House image. Click for full size.
February 21, 2011
4. The Pry Farm House
for the Union Army of the Potomac and an organizational genius. He restructured the army’s medical care in the field and established an ambulance corps that was first successfully utilized at Antietam. His leadership helped bring order from chaos in the aftermath of the battle
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Also see . . .  Pry House Field Hospital Museum. National Park Service (Submitted on February 21, 2011.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Close-up of Map on Marker image. Click for full size.
February 21, 2011
5. Close-up of Map on Marker
Gen. Richardson in the Pry House image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, August 13, 2013
6. Gen. Richardson in the Pry House
One of the officers who was treated at the Pry House Hospital was Maj. Gen. Israel Richardson, who was wounded at the Bloody Lane. President Lincoln visited Richardson here during his stay. He died in this room on November 3, 1862. This display inside the Pry House shows Richardson's wife watching over the general.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on . This page has been viewed 580 times since then and 4 times this year. Photos:   1. submitted on .   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3, 4, 5. submitted on .   6. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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