Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Stillwater in Saratoga County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Stillwater Blockhouse

 
 
Stillwater Blockhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 27, 2007
1. Stillwater Blockhouse Marker
Inscription.
Blockhouse
Replica of an 18th century
blockhouse. Built in 1927.
Original visitor center at
Saratoga Battlefield.
Moved to this site in 1999.

 
Erected by Stillwater Blockhouse Comm.
 
Location. 42° 56.247′ N, 73° 39.39′ W. Marker is in Stillwater, New York, in Saratoga County. Marker is on Hudson Ave. (New York State Route 4), on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Stillwater NY 12170, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Gen. Henry Knox Trail (about 600 feet away, measured in a direct line); Stillwater World War I Memorial (about 600 feet away); The Academy (about 700 feet away); Schuyler Mansion (approx. 0.2 miles away); Harmanus Schuyler Mansion (approx. 0.2 miles away); United Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Historic Sites (approx. 0.4 miles away); Dirck Swart House (approx. half a mile away). Click for a list of all markers in Stillwater.
 
Regarding Stillwater Blockhouse. Located in the center of the Village of Stillwater, New York the Stillwater Blockhouse is historically unique. It was built in part with timbers from Revolutionary
Blockhouse Marker, Hudson River Beyond image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
2. Blockhouse Marker, Hudson River Beyond
era structures once standing within what is now Saratoga National Historical Park, in Stillwater. It replicates the early 18th century blockhouses of the region, but was actually built in 1927 as New York State turned the site of the American Revolutionís 1777 “Turning Point Battles” into an historical park.


The “Battlefield Blockhouse” as it was first known, was a popular attraction used primarily as a visitor center-museum. Later, a new and larger visitor center-museum was erected and park officials eventually decided in 1975 to donate the Blockhouse to the Town of Stillwater.


Today, the Stillwater Blockhouse, and the Historic Marker, stand in a small riverfront park (approx. 2 acres) on a notably scenic section of the Hudson River. The riverfront park rests at the heart of the Village of Stillwater, east of U.S. Route 4 & N.Y. Route 32. Visitors can see "loopholes" used to shoot muskets through, colonial era artifacts and photos from earlier days in Stillwater. The Blockhouse is open from noon - 4 pm on Friday through Sunday and there is no admission charge.

 
Also see . . .
1. New York State Military Museum: Forts, Stillwater Blockhouse. (Submitted on February 25, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
2. The Stillwater Blockhouse Museum, Town of Stillwater, New York:. (Submitted on February 25, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
Blockhouse Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, August 27, 2007
3. Blockhouse Marker

 
Additional comments.
1.
Captain Thomas Anbury (1759-1840) served with General Burgoyne's royal army during the early years of the American Revolutionary War and was captured and made prisoner at Saratoga by the colonial forces. Upon receiving his parole, he travelled throughout the colonies, an interested but not especially objective observer (He thought slavery a curse). The following was written by Anbury in his book, "Travels Through the Interior Parts of America";
"Blockhouses not being generally known in England, I shall give a description of them. They are constructed of timbers, placed one on the other, of a sufficient thickness to resist a musket shot, and large enough to contain from 100 to 120 men; there are two apartment in them, one above the other, the upper of which is a division for the officers. In both the lower and upper apartment are two pieces of cannon and four port-holes for the purpose of pointing these canon on any side of the blockhouse on which it may be attacked, and in case and enemy should in the night endeavor to set fire to the house, there are loopholes, through which the troops on the inside can level their pieces and fire upon the assailants. But that the reader may more fully comprehend the construction of these unusual fortifications, I have made a drawing
Stillwater Blockhouse image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
4. Stillwater Blockhouse
and section of one of them..."
    — Submitted February 24, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.

 
Categories. Colonial EraForts, CastlesWar, US Revolutionary
 
Stillwater Blockhouse image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
5. Stillwater Blockhouse
Thomas Anbury Blockhouse Drawing image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
6. Thomas Anbury Blockhouse Drawing
A Section and Plan of a Blockhouse by Thomas Anbury on display at the entrance to the Stillwater Blockhouse.
Stillwater Blockhouse Marker Detail image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous
7. Stillwater Blockhouse Marker Detail
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 611 times since then and 12 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   7. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bill Pfingsten was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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