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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Capitol Hill in Washington, District of Columbia — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Japanese American Memorial to Patriotism During World War II

 
 
History Narrative, Panel 1 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 6, 2008
1. History Narrative, Panel 1
Inscription on inner west circle, southeast wall.
Inscription. [Panel 1 of the historical narrative at memorial entrance]:
On February 19, 1942, 73 days after the United States entered World War II, President Franklin Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 which resulted in the removal of 120,000 Japanese American men, women, and children from their homes in the western states and Hawaii.

Allowed only what they could carry, families were forced to abandon homes, friends, farms and businesses to live in ten remote relocation centers guarded by armed troops and surrounded by barbed wire fences. Some remained in the relocation centers until March 1946.

[Panel 2 of the historical narrative at memorial entrance]:
In addition, 4,500 were arrested by the Justice Department and held in internment camps such as at Santa Fe, New Mexico; 2,500 were also held at the family camp in Crystal City, Texas.

Answering the call to duty, young Japanese Americans entered into military service, joining many pre-war draftees. The 100th Infantry Battalion an 442nd Regimental Combat Team, fighting in Europe, became the most highly decorated Army unit for its size and length of service in American military history. Japanese Americans in the Military Intelligence Service used their bilingual skills to help shorten the war in the Pacific and thus saved countless American lives.
History Narrative, Panel 2 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 6, 2008
2. History Narrative, Panel 2
Inscription on inner west circle, southeast wall.
The 1399th Engineer Construction Battalion helped fortify the infrastructure essential for victory.

[Panel 3 of the historical narrative at memorial entrance]:
In 1983, almost forty years after the war ended, the federal Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians found that there had been no military necessity for the mass imprisonment of Japanese Americans and that a grave injustice had been done.

In 1988, President Ronald W. Reagan signed the Civil Liberties Act which made an apology for the injustice, provided minimal compensation, and reaffirmed the nation's commitment to equal justice under the law for all Americans.
 
Erected 2000 by National Japanese American Memorial Foundation.
 
Location. 38° 53.672′ N, 77° 0.629′ W. Marker is in Capitol Hill, District of Columbia, in Washington. Marker is on Louisiana Avenue, NW, just east of New Jersey Avenue, NW, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. The National Japanese American Memorial marker is located just north of the Capitol on a triangular plot bounded by Louisiana Avenue, New Jersey Avenue and D Street NW. Marker is in this post office area: Washington DC 20001, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker.
History Narrative, Panel 3 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 6, 2008
3. History Narrative, Panel 3
Inscription on inner west circle, southeast wall.
Acacia Life Insurance Building – 1936 (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); U.S. Reservation 196 (approx. 0.2 miles away); “The President’s Trees” (approx. 0.2 miles away); Famine-Genocide in Ukraine (approx. 0.2 miles away); Delaware Avenue & Columbus Circle, NE (approx. 0.2 miles away); Christopher Columbus (approx. ¼ mile away); "All Aboard" (approx. ¼ mile away); The Freedom Bell (approx. ¼ mile away).
 
Also see . . .
1. 442nd Regimental Combat Team. (Submitted on June 8, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
2. Japanese American Internment. (Submitted on June 8, 2008, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional keywords. Nisei
 
Categories. Asian AmericansCivil RightsHeroesWar, World II
 
Japanese American Memorial to Patriotism During World War II. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 6, 2008
4. Japanese American Memorial to Patriotism During World War II.
Entrance to the memorial, off Louisiana Avenue. The back side of the wall inscribed with its historical narrative is to the right, middle of photo.
President Truman's tribute to Japanese American veterans, 1946 image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 6, 2008
5. President Truman's tribute to Japanese American veterans, 1946
You fought not only the enemy
but you fought prejudice - and you won
Keep up that fight
and we will continue to win
to make this great republic stand for
what the constitution says it stands for
the welfare of all of the people
all the time
[This inscription is adjacent to the honor roll on the memorial's north wall.]
'Crane Monument' - centerpiece of the Memorial's west circle. image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 6, 2008
6. 'Crane Monument' - centerpiece of the Memorial's west circle.
Bronze sculpture by Nina Akamu: cranes entangled in barbed wire.
View from east sidewalk, across the Zen-inspired pool and garden image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 6, 2008
7. View from east sidewalk, across the Zen-inspired pool and garden
The Crane Monument is at the left rear, and the names of ten WWII internment camps are inscribed on the inner, northwest wall, behind.
"Here we admit a wrong. Here we confirm our commitment as a nation to equal justice under the law." image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 6, 2008
8. "Here we admit a wrong. Here we confirm our commitment as a nation to equal justice under the law."
President Reagan's remarks upon signing the Civil Liberties Act, August 1988.
View of inner west circle, southeast wall - the U.S. Capitol is hidden by the trees in background image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, June 6, 2008
9. View of inner west circle, southeast wall - the U.S. Capitol is hidden by the trees in background
The historical narrative is on the right. President Reagan's quote is inscribed in the center. Comments of Nisei leaders (Norman Mineta, Mike Masaoka, and Robert Matsui) appear on the left.
"Here We Honor Those Who Died in Service during World War II" image. Click for full size.
By Richard E. Miller, January 15, 2004
10. "Here We Honor Those Who Died in Service during World War II"
List of names and tributes from officials along the memorial's north wall.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 3,890 times since then and 5 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   5. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   6, 7, 8, 9, 10. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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