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Mechanicville in Saratoga County, New York — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Col. Ellsworth

 
 
Col. Ellsworth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2010
1. Col. Ellsworth Marker
Inscription.
Lincolnís law clerk, first
Union officer killed in Civil
War 5-24-1861. Final resting
place Hudson View Cemetery,
Mechanicville, with parents.

 
Erected by City of Mechanicville.
 
Location. 42° 53.969′ N, 73° 41.395′ W. Marker is in Mechanicville, New York, in Saratoga County. Marker is at the intersection of Central Avenue South (U.S. 4) and South Street, on the right when traveling south on Central Avenue South. Click for map. Marker is located on the southwest corner of the intersection. Marker is in this post office area: Mechanicville NY 12118, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Gen. Henry Knox Trail (approx. ľ mile away); Canal Square (approx. half a mile away); Historic Yards (approx. half a mile away); Harmanus Schuyler Mansion (approx. 3 miles away); Schuyler Mansion (approx. 3 miles away); Stillwater World War I Memorial (approx. 3.1 miles away); a different marker also named Gen. Henry Knox Trail (approx. 3.1 miles away); Stillwater Blockhouse (approx. 3.1 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Mechanicville.
 
More about this marker. The marker is at the intersection of
Col. Ellsworth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
2. Col. Ellsworth Marker
Central Ave South, better known as routes 4 and 32, and South Street. South Street leads west from the intersection to the entrance of the Hudson View Cemetery where Coln. Ellsworth is buried.

 
Also see . . .
1. Elmer Ellsworth (1837-1861). Mr. Lincolnís White House website. (Submitted on October 10, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.) 

2. Elmer Ellsworth (1837-1861). (Submitted on October 10, 2010, by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.)
3. Ellsworth Uniform with Bullet Hole. (Submitted on March 7, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
4. The Ellsworth Eagle. (Submitted on March 7, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
5. National Portrait Gallery -150th Commemoration of the Civil War:. (Submitted on June 12, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
6. ABC News - NY Honoring 1st Union Officer Killed in Civil War. (Submitted on June 12, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Ellsworth in Mechanicville
The marker is at the intersection of Central Ave South, better known as routes 4 and 32, and South Street. South Street leads west from the intersection to the entrance of the Hudson View Cemetery. The Ellsworth grave site is in the Hudson View Cemetery which overlooks the City of Mechanicville. The Ellsworth monumnet is located in the "Old Section"
Marker in Mechanicville image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2010
3. Marker in Mechanicville
A Zouave Colonel, Elmer Ellsworth was killed while removing a Confederate flag in Alexandria, Virginia that was flying within sight of Washington, DC.
of the cemetery and is surrounded by a low wrought iron fence with a gate. The plot is located approximately at N 42.89817 W 73.69187. The New York State Military Museam and Veterans Reserch Center in Saratoga Springs, New York has the uniform Col. Ellsworth was wearing when he was fataly shot in its collection as well as the original historic flag that Ellsworth took down from the Marshall House hotel in Alexandria, Virgina. The City of Mechaniville logo features an image of Ellsworth, and a side street in the city is named Ellsworth Ave.
    — Submitted March 7, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.

2. The Marshall House Flag
Shortly after the Confederates bombarded Fort Sumter, South Carolina, in April 1861, James Jackson hoisted an extremely large Confederate national flag onto a 40-foot-tall flagpole atop his hotel, the Marshall House, in Alexandria, Virginia. On May 24, 1861, Federal forces, including Colonel Elmer Ellsworth and the 11th New York Volunteers, entered Alexandria.

Ellsworth decided to remove Jacksonís flag from the Marshall House hotel. With a small party, including Corporal Francis Brownell of Troy, New York, Ellsworth climbed to the roof and cut down the flag. During their descent Ellsworth and his party encountered Jackson, who was armed
Col. Ellsworth Marker, Looking North image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
4. Col. Ellsworth Marker, Looking North
Marker is on the west side Central Ave South, better know as Routes 4 & 32. The railroad overpass is in the distance.
with a shotgun. Gunfire ensued, leaving both the hotel owner Jackson and the charismatic Ellsworth dead. The Marshall House incident became national news and plunged the entire country into mourning – the North for Ellsworth, the South for Jackson. The Marshall House flag accompanied Ellsworth's body home to New York State. Relics connected to Ellsworthís death became prized possessions, including pieces cut, or “souvenired,” from the flag.

The Marshall House flag, in the collection of the New York State Military Museum, has been conserved at the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservationís textile laboratory at Peebles Island in Waterford, New York. As part of the New York State Battle Flag Preservation Project, the preservation and display of the Marshall House Flag has made possible with generous support from the Coby Foundation.

Alexandria, Virginia sail maker John W. Padgett, his wife Libby, and her sister Sarah Graham made the Marshall House flag for a local dockworker, Charles Taylor, for $30.00. When James Jackson, a resolute confederate sympathizer, heard about the flag, he offered to fly it from his hotel. The wool flag is believed to have originally included seven stars in a circular pattern in the canton, one each for the first seven states to secede from the Union, and a larger white star in the center
Col. Ellsworth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
5. Col. Ellsworth Marker
Marker is on the left beside the telephone pole.
allegedly representing Virginia.
    — Submitted January 28, 2013, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.

 
Additional keywords. Elmer Ellsworth
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesWar, US Civil
 
Col. Ellsworth Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, October 9, 2010
6. Col. Ellsworth Marker
Death of Col. Ellsworth image. Click for full size.
Wikipedia
7. Death of Col. Ellsworth
Col. Ellsworth plot in the Hudson View Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
8. Col. Ellsworth plot in the Hudson View Cemetery
The tall monument is to Col. Ellsworth, the headstones to the left are for his parents; Ephraim D. Ellsworth & Phebe Denton His Wife
Ellsworth Plot & Memorial in Hudson View Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
9. Ellsworth Plot & Memorial in Hudson View Cemetery
Ellsworth Memorial in Hudson View Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
10. Ellsworth Memorial in Hudson View Cemetery
The west face of the monument has a bronze plaque with a bas relief portrait of Ellsworth surrounded by a laurel wreath which has a ribbon with stars and the word "EXCELSIOR written on the ribbon. Excelsior is the offical motto of New York State, and can be translated from Latin as "ever upwards."
Ellsworth Memorial in Hudson View Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
11. Ellsworth Memorial in Hudson View Cemetery
The south face of the Ellsworth monument reads:
The State of New York
Unites in Commemorating
The Patriotism of
Colonel Ellsworth.
By Contributing out of
The Public Funds to the
Erection of this Monument
Chapter 760 Laws of 1873
Ellsworth Memorial in Hudson View Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
12. Ellsworth Memorial in Hudson View Cemetery
The east face of the Ellsworth monument reads:
"I am Content.
Confident that He who Noteth
Even the Fall of a Sparrow.
Will have Some Purpose
Even in the Fate of One Like Me."
Ellsworth Memorial in Hudson View Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
13. Ellsworth Memorial in Hudson View Cemetery
The north face of the Ellsworth monument reads:
Col. Elmer E. Ellsworth
Commander of
The 1st Regiment of New
York Fire Zouaves.
Born at Malta, Saratoga
Co., N.Y. Apr. 11, 1837
Killed at Alexandria, Va.
May 24th 1861. In taking
The First Rebel Flag
In the War for the Union
The Volunteer Fire Department of
The City of New York Cooperated
In Erecting this Monument.
Ellsworth Eagle - Hudson View Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, February 20, 2011
14. Ellsworth Eagle - Hudson View Cemetery
Detail of the brass eagle atop the Ellsworth Memorial

At some point in early 1997 this large, 300-pound brass eagle was stolen from atop the grave site monument to Col. Elmer Ellsworth. In December of 1997 a notice with photo, was posted on the Internet by The Sons Of Union Veterans Of The Civil War, which was spotted by an antique dealer in Massachusetts who had the eagle. The authorities were contacted, and one week later the eagle was home.
Col. Elmer E. Ellsworth image. Click for full size.
New York Public Library
15. Col. Elmer E. Ellsworth
City of Mechanicville, N.Y. Logo image. Click for full size.
By The City of Mechanicville
16. City of Mechanicville, N.Y. Logo
The City of Mechanicville logo features an image of Col. Ellsworth.
The Marshall House Flag image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, January 27, 2013
17. The Marshall House Flag
The Marshall House Flag is seen here on dispay in the New York State Museum in Albany. Portions of the flag are missing. When the flag accompanied Ellsworth's body home to New York State people cut souvenier pieces from the flag.
The Marshall House image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, January 27, 2013
18. The Marshall House
The Marshall House is shown flying the flag in this New York State Museum display panel.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,089 times since then and 7 times this year. Last updated on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   3. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   4, 5. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   6. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   7. submitted on .   8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   14, 15, 16. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.   17, 18. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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