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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Windsor Locks in Hartford County, Connecticut — The American Northeast (New England)
 

Windsor Locks

 
 
Windsor Locks Marker (Front) image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, March 25, 2007
1. Windsor Locks Marker (Front)
Inscription. (front)
Windsor Locks

Incorporated May 30, 1854, the town was formerly Pine Meadow district of Windsor. A Dutch trader, Captain Adriaen Block, came up the Connecticut River in the spring of 1614 as far as Enfield Rapids.

The first three settlers were: Henry Denslow 1663, Nathaniel Gaylord-1678, and Abraham Dibble - 1708.

Seth Dexter founded the Dexter Company in 1767. The first one-horse-drawn wagon in this area was made by David Birge in 1815.

The Windsor Locks Canal was completed in 1829. Charles Dexter was appointed first postmaster in 1833.

The first town officials included Lucius Chapman, Talcott Mather, and Oliver Hayden-Selectmen, and Charles Spencer - Town Clerk. The first town meeting was held July 3, 1854.
(Continued on other side)


(reverse)
Windsor Locks

(Continued from other side)
Rail transportation was inaugurated in 1844. Trolley service began in 1904. Public buses first operated June 24, 1924. Bradley Field was opened as a military airbase in 1941. Commercial airlines using the facility have served this area since 1947. It is now Bradley International Airport.

Ella T. Grasso of Windsor Locks was elected first woman governor of Connecticut in November, 1974.

Old
Windsor Locks Marker (Back) image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, March 25, 2007
2. Windsor Locks Marker (Back)
Country Road is described in George Washington's diary under date of October, 1789: “Between Windsor and Suffield you pass through level, barren and uncultivated plain for miles.” This refers to Windsor Locks.

Erected May 30, 1976
by the Windor Locks American Revolution
Bicentennial Commission
the Windsor Locks Historical Society
and the Connecticut Historical Commission

 
Erected 1976 by Windor Locks American Revolution Bicentennial Commission, the Windsor Locks Historical Society, and the Connecticut Historical Commission.
 
Location. 41° 55.904′ N, 72° 37.672′ W. Marker is in Windsor Locks, Connecticut, in Hartford County. Marker is at the intersection of Main Street (Connecticut Route 159) and Oak Street, on the right when traveling south on Main Street. Click for map. Marker is across the street from the historic Windsor Locks train station. Marker is in this post office area: Windsor Locks CT 06096, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 4 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Windsor Locks Vietnam War Monument (approx. half a mile away); Windsor Locks World War I and II Monument (approx. half a mile away); Windsor Locks Korean Conflict Monument
Windsor Locks Train Station image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, March 25, 2007
3. Windsor Locks Train Station
The existing abandoned passenger train station was built in 1875 by the New York, New Haven and Hartford Railroad, some 31 years after the railroad came through Windsor Locks, replacing transportation of goods and people on the Connecticut River and its canal at Windsor Locks, Connecticut. Dwight Eisenhower visited the Windsor Locks Train Station on a whistle stop during his presidency (1953-1961) much to the joy of the townspeople and school children who were let out and gathered at the station.
(approx. half a mile away); Soldiers Memorial Hall (approx. half a mile away); Suffield Veterans Monument (approx. 3.6 miles away); Birthplace of Oliver Ellsworth (approx. 3.7 miles away); Suffield (approx. 3.7 miles away); Suffield Soldiers Memorial (approx. 3.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Windsor Locks.
 
Also see . . .
1. Windsor Locks Preservation Association, Inc. (Submitted on March 13, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
2. Windsor Locks Historical Society's Noden-Reed Museum. (Submitted on March 13, 2011, by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York.)
 
Categories. Settlements & Settlers
 
Windsor Locks Train Station - View from Main Street image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, March 25, 2007
4. Windsor Locks Train Station - View from Main Street
The last boarding passes were sold about 1971 and the building was closed thereabouts. Slated for demolition, the building was placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975 (the Station 100th anniversary) by a group called, The Save The Station Committee. The newly formed Windsor Locks Preservation Association is working hard to save this last piece of heritage.
Windsor Locks Railroad Station image. Click for full size.
Windsor Locks Historical Society
5. Windsor Locks Railroad Station
Windsor Locks Canal image. Click for full size.
By Howard C. Ohlhous, March 25, 2007
6. Windsor Locks Canal
The Windsor Locks Canal, built in 1829, allowed navigation on the Connecticut River past the Enfield Rapids. Windsor Locks, CT
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. This page has been viewed 1,331 times since then and 33 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Howard C. Ohlhous of Duanesburg, New York. • Bernard Fisher was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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