Marker Logo HMdb.org THE HISTORICAL
MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Near Jacksonville in Duval County, Florida — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

African Identity

African Identity and Archaeology at Kingsley Plantation

 

—African Identity in the Archival Record —

 
African Identity Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 26, 2010
1. African Identity Marker
Inscription. The birthplace of African-American archaeology can be traced to Kingsley Plantation, where archaeologists in 1968 first began to search for artifacts that reflected African identity. Many of the slaves that lived here during Zephaniah Kingsley's era (1814-1839) were African-born or the children of Africans. A list of Kingsley slaves prior to his arrival on Fort George Island provides examples of their nationalities or language groups: Ibo, Calaban, Rio Pong, Soosoo, and Zanzibar.

Kingsley allowed his Africans to keep their tribal names instead of forcing Anglicized names upon them. African names included Quamila, Beechy, M'Badnie, Tita, Aibo, Cabo, M'Sooma, Motorro, Tamafia, and Anobia. Children born at Kingsley's plantations were also given African names, such as the boy named Badju and another boy named Mtoto, the Swahili word for "child."

Zephaniah and Anna Kingsley are most remembered at Kingsley Plantation, but much of the history of the site was made by the hundreds of enslaved Africans forced to work the fields. These individuals lived and died with scarce written accounts of their being. Beyond a rare list of names, these man, women, and children are virtually absent from historic records. This erasure from history is true for enslaved men and women throughout the Americas. Without written records, this lost
African Identity Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 26, 2010
2. African Identity Marker
View of the historical marker (seen on the left) situated near the northern end of the row of slave cabins.
history can only be brought back to life through archaeology.
 
Erected by National Park Service.
 
Location. 30° 26.212′ N, 81° 26.313′ W. Marker is near Jacksonville, Florida, in Duval County. Marker can be reached from Palmetto Avenue 2.1 miles north of Fort George Road, on the left when traveling north. Click for map. This historical marker is located in a national park. The historical marker is in a very remote area that is reached by traveling a considerable distance on an unpaved dirt road. To get there one must turn north, off of the Florida State Route 1A (Heckscher Road), onto Fort George Road, and then traveling about 0.6 miles to the intersection of Fort George Road and Palmetto Avenue, were you turn north on Palmetto Avenue and travel to the end of this road to reach the historical marker. The turn-off from state route 1A can be identified by the "Kingsley Plantation, Fort George Island Visitor Center" sign that is situated right at the turnoff point. Marker is in this post office area: Jacksonville FL 32226, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named African Identity (here, next to this marker); Slave Cabins (within shouting distance of this marker); a different
African Identity Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 26, 2010
3. African Identity Marker
View of the northern row of slave cabins, with the historical marker being located at the northern end of this row.
marker also named Slave Cabins (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Slave Cabins (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Slave Cabins (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Slave Cabins (about 300 feet away); a different marker also named Slave Cabins (about 300 feet away); Slaves Cabins (about 700 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Jacksonville.
 
Also see . . .
1. Kingsley Plantation. This is a link to information provided by the National Park Service. (Submitted on March 13, 2011, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

2. Kingsley Plantation National Historic Site. This is a link to information provided by G.O.R.P.(Great Outdoor Recreation Pages). (Submitted on March 13, 2011, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 

3. Kingsley Plantation. This is a link to information provided by Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. (Submitted on March 13, 2011, by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansAgricultureSettlements & Settlers
 
African Identity Marker image. Click for full size.
By Dale K. Benington, June 26, 2010
4. African Identity Marker
View of the roadway sign, located at the turn-off from state route 1A, that marks the way to the Kingsley Plantation.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page has been viewed 709 times since then and 5 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Dale K. Benington of Toledo, Ohio. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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