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Benedict in Charles County, Maryland — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
Camp Stanton
 
Camp Stanton Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Richard E. Miller, October 20, 2007
1. Camp Stanton Marker
 
Inscription. Camp Stanton was established in this area, October, 1863, for the recruiting and training of the Seventh, Ninth, Nineteenth and Thirtieth United States Colored Infantry.
 
Erected by Charles County Civil War Centennial Commission.
 
Location. 38° 30.957′ N, 76° 40.822′ W. Marker is in Benedict, Maryland, in Charles County. Marker is at the intersection of Prince Frederick Road (Maryland Route 231) and Mill Creek Road/Bendict Avenue cut off, on the right when traveling east on Prince Frederick Road. Click for map. This marker is half a mile before (i.e. west of) the Patuxent River Bridge in a triangular parkway at the intersection, together with another marker that commemorates the town of Benedict. Marker is in this post office area: Benedict MD 20612, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 6 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Benedict (here, next to this marker); The British are Coming (approx. 0.4 miles away); a different marker also named Camp Stanton (approx. 0.8 miles away); Maxwell Hall (approx. 3.2 miles away); St. Johnís Holiness Church (approx. 3.2 miles away); Battle Creek Cypress Swamp (approx. 5.2 miles away); Joseph & James Wilkinson (approx. 5.3 miles away); Alarming Sight (approx. 5.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Benedict.
 
Camp Stanton Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Mike Stroud, March 4, 2010
2. Camp Stanton Marker
View is looking east along State Road 231.
 

 
More about this marker. Maryland Civil War Trails signage gives further directions to the actual site where the camp stood during the War of the Rebellion.
 
Regarding Camp Stanton. The camp was named for Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton. The trainees were all of African descent and most had recently been freed from slavery elsewhere in Maryland in order to fight in the War of the Rebellion. Many would die in camp from exposure during the severe winter of 1863, but the survivors would march into combat with their regiments in Virginia, the Carolinas, and elsewhere during 1864 and 1865. Of the four regiments, the Seventh suffered the highest number killed in action (85), and two white officers with the Thirtieth would be recipients of the Medal of Honor.

The Trails marker at the Benedict Marina expounds on the story of Col. John H. Sothoron, a very wealthy rebel sympathizer who fled to Virginia after killing U.S. Lieut. Eben White in October 1863 when the latter came to his nearby plantation with two Black soldiers on a mission to recruit his own enslaved Blacks for Federal military service. Sothoron would be acquitted of murder charges by a local jury after returning to Benedict at the end of the war.
 
Additional keywords.
 
Benedict Marina - area once the site of Camp Stanton Photo, Click for full size
By Richard E. Miller, October 20, 2007
3. Benedict Marina - area once the site of Camp Stanton
 
United States Colored Troops, USCT
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on December 8, 2007, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. This page has been viewed 2,349 times since then. Last updated on December 10, 2007, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1. submitted on December 8, 2007, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.   2. submitted on March 7, 2010, by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   3. submitted on December 8, 2007, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page.
 
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