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New Buffalo in Berrien County, Michigan — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)
 

The Iron Brigade / The Twenty-Fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment

 
 
The Iron Brigade Marker image. Click for full size.
By M. Bowyer, July 9, 2007
1. The Iron Brigade Marker
Inscription. The Iron Brigade
The Iron Brigade became one of the most celebrated military units on the American Civil War (1861–1865). Wearing distinctive black hats, they were easily recognised by friend and foe alike. The five volunteer regiments in the brigade were the 2nd, 6th and 7th Wisconsin, the 19th Indiana and the 24th Michigan. These regiments ranked among the most gallant and effective of the Union Army. U.S. 12, which intersects nearby, is named the Iron Brigade Memorial Highway in their honor.

The Iron Brigade was given its nickname by General George B. McClellan as he witnessed them stand like “iron” against the enemy in Turner’s Gap at the battle of South Mountain, Maryland, September 14, 1862. They served in all major engagements of the Army of the Potomac.

Iron Brigade casualties ranked among the highest of the war. The 2nd Wisconsin suffered the greatest percentage loss of the entire Union Army, the 7th Wisconsin had more men killed in battle than any other Union regiment and the 24th Michigan sustained the greatest numerical loss of all Union regiments involved at Gettysburg.

The Twenty-Fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment
The 24th Michigan Infantry mustered into U. S. service August 15, 1862 numbering 1,030 men. Commanded by Colonel
Back of the Iron Brigade Marker (The Twenty-Fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment) image. Click for full size.
By M. Bowyer, July 9, 2007
2. Back of the Iron Brigade Marker (The Twenty-Fourth Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment)
Henry A. Morrow, these volunteer soldiers became part of the famous Iron Brigade and first distinguished themselves, under enemy fire, at the battle of Fredericksburg. Virginia. They fought at Chancellorsville and in three other engagements before Gettysburg—where they entered the battle with 496 men. After the first day’s fight, only 99 men remained with their flag. The sacrifice of the 24th Michigan and the Iron Brigade helped slow the Confederate advance upon Gettysburg and allowed Federal forces to gain a position for victory.

The 24th Michigan struggled through 14 more battles, including the siege of Petersburg, Virginia. New recruits brought the regiment back to full strength and on May 4, 1865 they served as funeral escort for President Abraham Lincoln in Springfield, Illinois. The regiment mustered out and disbanded at Detroit, Michigan on June 30, 1865.

Henry Morrow rose to command the Iron Brigade in 1865. General Morrow is buried nearby in Silver Brook Cemetery, Niles, Michigan.
 
Erected 1994 by the Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War, M.O.L.L.U.S., 24th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment, Inc.
 
Location. 41° 45.894′ N, 86° 44.46′ W. Marker is in New Buffalo, Michigan, in Berrien County. Marker is on Interstate
Long shot of the Twenty-fourth regiment marker image. Click for full size.
By M. Bowyer, July 9, 2007
3. Long shot of the Twenty-fourth regiment marker
94. Click for map. The Welcome Center is just past the state line (leaving Indiana, entering Michigan). Marker is in this post office area: New Buffalo MI 49117, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. New Buffalo Welcome Center (within shouting distance of this marker); Eisenhower Interstate System (within shouting distance of this marker); West Michigan Pike (approx. 2.4 miles away); Gordon Beach Inn (approx. 4.7 miles away); Lakeside Inn (approx. 6.3 miles away); The Dewey Cannon (approx. 7.3 miles away); Battle of Trail Creek (approx. 7.5 miles away in Indiana); Camp Anderson (approx. 7.7 miles away in Indiana). Click for a list of all markers in New Buffalo.
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker.
 
Also see . . .  The Iron Brigade. (Submitted on July 14, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Long shot of the Iron Brigade marker. image. Click for full size.
By M. Bowyer, July 9, 2007
4. Long shot of the Iron Brigade marker.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by M. Bowyer of Indianapolis, Indiana. This page has been viewed 5,160 times since then and 66 times this year. Last updated on , by Christopher Light of Valparaiso, Indiana. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by M. Bowyer of Indianapolis, Indiana. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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