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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Hampton, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Aberdeen Gardens

 
 
Aberdeen Gardens Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, July 31, 2010
1. Aberdeen Gardens Marker
Inscription. Built "by Negroes for Negroes," Aberdeen Gardens began in 1934 as the model resettlement community for Negro families. It was the only such community in the United States designed by a Negro architect (Hilyard R. Robinson) and built by Negro contractors and laborers. Aberdeen Gardens is composed of 158 brick houses on large garden lots, a school, and a community store, all within a greenbelt. The streets, excepting Aberdeen Road, are named for prominent Negroes. Aberdeen Gardens offered home ownership and an improved quality of life in a rural setting. In 1994 this nationally significant neighborhood was listed as a Virginia landmark and in the National Register of Historic Places, through the efforts of former and current residents.
 
Erected 1994 by Department of Historic Resources. (Marker Number W 95.)
 
Location. 37° 2.014′ N, 76° 24.359′ W. Marker is in Hampton, Virginia. Marker is on Aberdeen Road 0.1 miles north of East Weaver Road, on the right when traveling north. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1424 Aberdeen Road, Hampton VA 23666, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 3 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Camp Alexander (approx. 2.4 miles away); Third Elizabeth City Parish Church
Aberdeen Rd (facing north) image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, July 31, 2010
2. Aberdeen Rd (facing north)
(approx. 2.5 miles away); Third Church at Kecoughtan (approx. 2.5 miles away); Newport News POW Camp (approx. 2.7 miles away); Confederate Dead (approx. 2.7 miles away); The Clark Oak (approx. 2.7 miles away); A Behemoth in the Field (approx. 2.7 miles away); Copeland - Newsome Park (approx. 2.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Hampton.
 
Also see . . .
1. Aberdeen Gardens: Building a Community "For blacks, by blacks.". (Submitted on August 3, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
2. The Historical Foundation of Aberdeen Gardens. (Submitted on August 3, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.)
3. HGTV Aberdeen Gardens. (Submitted on August 3, 2010.)
4. Aberdeen Gardens Historic District (pdf files). Registration Form for the National Register of Historic Places. “Aberdeen Gardens was a Roosevelt Administration era planned community, designed specifically for the resettlement of African-American workers of the Newport News and Hampton area, who were living in substandard housing. Begun in 1934 and finished by 1937, this unique 110-acre subdivision consists of 158 single-family homes and proposed a school, commercial and community center, and a church, all surrounded by a greenbelt area for subsistence and truck farming.' In addition to the Colonial Revival houses, one of the preexisting vernacular farm houses, purchased from the Todd family, became a resettlement residence. The project, sponsored by Hampton Institute (now Hampton University) and funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Division of Subsistence Housing (later transferred to the Resettlement Administration), was planned and designed by Howard University's Hilyard R. Robinson (1899-1986), supervising architect, with Louis B. Walton (1889-1973), consulting architect. Jesse R. Otis, also an African American, acted as program supervisor.” (Submitted on August 3, 2010, by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. African AmericansMan-Made Features
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page has been viewed 889 times since then and 33 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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