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MARKER DATABASE
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Mendota in Dakota County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Sibley House Historic Site

 
 
Sibley House Historic Site Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, October 27, 2010
1. Sibley House Historic Site Marker
Inscription. Welcome to the Sibley House Historic Site! This area had long been the center of travel and trade for the Dakota when it became the center for American Fur Company operations on the Upper Mississippi. It was also home to Minnesota's first governor, Henry Sibley.

The stone houses you see below are the remnants of the vibrant operation of the fur trade centered here from the late 1700s to the 1850s. When 23-year-old Henry Sibley arrived to take over operations in 1834, he came roughly to this point.

Sibley later wrote: "When I reached the brink of the hill overlooking the surrounding country, I was struck with the picturesque beauty of the scene. From that outlook the course of the Mississippi River from the north, suddenly turning eastward to where St. Paul now stands, the Minnesota River from the west, the principal tributary of the main stream and at the junction, rose the military post of Fort Snelling perched upon a high and commanding point, with its stone walls, and blockhouses, bidding defiance to any attempt at capture."

The brick Dupuis House to your right was built in 1854 and today is the visitor center for the site. Feel free to tour the grounds on your own to learn more about early Mendota and the Sibley House Historic Site.

The site remained an active part of the fur trade until
Dupuis House / Historic Site Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, October 27, 2010
2. Dupuis House / Historic Site Visitor Center
The marker is to the left of the entrance (not shown).
the 1850s, when treaties led to the removal of Dakota to reservations along the Minnesota River in western Minnesota. The site was used for various purposes through the 19th century, but eventually fell into disrepair. In 1910, the Daughters of the American Revolution opened the Sibley House as the first historic site in the state. Today it is operated by the Minnesota Historical Society.

Historic Fort Snelling
Minnesota Historical Society
Sibley House Historic Site
All images are from the collections of the Minnesota Historical Society

 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Minnesota Historical Society marker series.
 
Location. 44° 53.252′ N, 93° 9.872′ W. Marker is in Mendota, Minnesota, in Dakota County. Marker can be reached from Sibley Memorial Highway (State Highway 13) west of D Street, on the right when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is at or near this postal address: 1357 Sibley Memorial Highway, Mendota MN 55150, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Henry Sibley and Old Mendota (about 400 feet away, measured in a direct line); General Henry Hastings Sibley (about 400 feet away); The First Stone House (about 400
Dupuis House / Historic Site Visitor Center image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, October 28, 2010
3. Dupuis House / Historic Site Visitor Center
feet away); Mendota / Sibley House Association (about 500 feet away); Faribault House (about 600 feet away); "Where the Waters Meet" (about 600 feet away); St. Peter's Church (approx. 0.2 miles away); Mendota / Sibley House (approx. 0.3 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Mendota.
 
More about this marker.
[photo captions, left to right]
This 1899 photograph shows the Faribault House (upper left), summer kitchen (left), and Sibley House (center) before restoration.
Fort Snelling and Mendota by Edward Thomas, about 1850.
The run-down Sibley House before restoration in 1910.
 
Also see . . .  Friends of the Sibley Historical Site. Hypolite Dupuis. (Submitted on March 28, 2011.) 
 
Categories. Industry & CommerceNative Americans
 
Nearby Fort Snelling image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, July 23, 2009
4. Nearby Fort Snelling
Fort Snelling image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, July 23, 2009
5. Fort Snelling
As noted on the marker, Henry Sibley wrote about the stone walls and blockhouses of Fort Snelling.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 672 times since then and 25 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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