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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Alexandria, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Battery Rodgers

 
 
Battery Rodgers Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 21, 2008
1. Battery Rodgers Marker
Inscription.
Historical Site
Defenses of Washington
1861-1865
Battery Rodgers

Here stood Battery Rodgers, built in 1863 to prevent enemy ships from passing up the Potomac River. The battery had a perimeter of 30 yards and mounted five 200 pounder Parrott guns and one 15-inch Rodman. It was deactivated in 1867.
 
Erected by the Civil War Round Table of Alexandria.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Defenses of Washington marker series.
 
Location. 38° 47.71′ N, 77° 2.598′ W. Marker is in Alexandria, Virginia. Marker is at the intersection of South Lee Street and Green Street, on the right on South Lee Street. Click for map. Marker is at the foot of Green Street. Marker is in this post office area: Alexandria VA 22314, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Guarding the Potomac (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Jones Point (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Lost Village of Cameron at Great Hunting Creek (approx. 0.2 miles away); World War I-Era Rudder (approx. 0.2 miles away); Prehistory to Colonial Settlement
Battery Rodgers Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 21, 2008
2. Battery Rodgers Marker
(approx. 0.2 miles away); The Emerging Nation (approx. 0.2 miles away); The Civil War and Battery Rodgers (approx. 0.2 miles away); World Wars to the Present (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Alexandria.
 
Also see . . .  George Washington Rodgers (1822-1863). (Submitted on April 3, 2011, by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland.)
 
Additional comments.
1. Battery Rodgers Particulars
From Mr. Lincoln's Forts: A Guide to the Civil War Defenses of Washington, by Benjamin Franklin Cooling III and Walton H. Owen II:

The battery stood along the 800 block of South Lee Street. Named for Navy Captain George W. Rodgers, killed in action at Charleston Harbor on August 17, 1863. The battery stood 28 feet above the river, and worked with Forts Foote and Washington to protect the river access to the Capital.

The "face" of the battery was 185 feet long, with side curtains of 60 to 80 feet protecting the flanks. The battery had two magazines, two bomb-proof filling rooms, a hospital, two barracks, a prison, and a mess hall. As mentioned on the marker, the armament was five 200-pdr
Battery Rodgers Marker image. Click for full size.
By J. J. Prats, June 21, 2008
3. Battery Rodgers Marker
Parrott Rifles and one 15-inch Rodman Gun. During most of the war, the battery was garrisoned by portions of the 1st Wisconsin Heavy Artillery.
    — Submitted June 21, 2008, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.

 
Categories. War, US CivilWaterways & Vessels
 
200 pdr. Parrot Rifle in Battery Rodgers image. Click for full size.
Courtesy of Library of Congress
4. 200 pdr. Parrot Rifle in Battery Rodgers
From the Civil War glass negative collection. Taken between 1862 and 1869. To the left of the Parrott Rifle is the 15-inch Rodman Gun.
Battery Rodgers image. Click for full size.
Library of Congress
5. Battery Rodgers
Another wartime photo of the battery showing the 15-inch Rodman (furthest) and the 200-pounder Parrott. Note the 15-inch gun was mounted on a center pivot barbette allowing 360 degree traverse. The Parrot was on a front pivot barbette, allowing a more limited traverse. The mountings are both riveted iron construction. In the background is one of the city wharves.
Capt. George Washington Rogers, II, U.S. Navy image. Click for full size.
By U. S. Navy
6. Capt. George Washington Rogers, II, U.S. Navy
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia. This page has been viewed 3,457 times since then and 11 times this year. Last updated on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by J. J. Prats of Springfield, Virginia.   5. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.   6. submitted on , by Richard E. Miller of Oxon Hill, Maryland. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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