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Lynchburg, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Old City Cemetery

Lynchburg, Virginia

 

—Civil War Sites —

 
Old City Cemetery  Lynchburg, Virginia  -  Civil War Sites marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
1. Old City Cemetery Lynchburg, Virginia - Civil War Sites marker
This marker is on the Battle of Lynchburg Trail of the Virginia Civil War Trails.
Inscription. “With a graveyard on one side, quartermaster’s glanders stable on the other, and smallpox hospital in the middle, one (is) reminded of the mortality of man.”
“A Confederate Surgeon’s Story,” Confederate Veteran, 1931, John Jay Terrell, M.D.

This Old City Cemetery served three distinct and important roles in the Civil War: it was a burial ground for over 2200 soldiers, both Union Confederate; it was the location of the Pest House smallpox quarantine hospital; and it was the location of the quartermaster’s glanders stable for innovative medical research on a disease affecting the Confederate cavalry horses. Each spot has more information on site.

Portions of this cemetery are still in active use. Since 1806 when the city founder John Lynch gave the first acre of land, it has been the final resting place for over 25,000 residents of this city. Included are a number of Civil War soldiers, both Union and Confederate, buried throughout the rest of the Cemetery. When possible, interpretive information and stories concerning these soldiers, as well as many other interesting citizens, are posted along the roadway and walkways.
 
Erected by Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker
Closeup of Cemetery map image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
2. Closeup of Cemetery map
series.
 
Location. 37° 24.946′ N, 79° 9.489′ W. Marker is in Lynchburg, Virginia. Marker is on Taylor Street, on the left when traveling west. Click for map. Marker is across from the Cemetery Center at the back of the cemetery. Marker is at or near this postal address: 401 Taylor Street, Lynchburg VA 24501, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Pest House Medical Museum (here, next to this marker); The Old Brick Wall (here, next to this marker); a different marker also named Old City Cemetery (a few steps from this marker); Sinister Activities (a few steps from this marker); The Carl Porter Cato Rose Collection (within shouting distance of this marker); Gravestone Carvers in the Old City Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Gravemarkers in the Old City Cemetery (within shouting distance of this marker); Cemetery Caretakers (within shouting distance of this marker). Click for a list of all markers in Lynchburg.
 
More about this marker. On the left are two portraits and an inset photo:
George A. Diuguid, undertaker, handled over 2700 of the deaths in Lynchburg during the Civil War. His precise records enabled accurate tombstones to be placed at each grave many years later. Hundreds of these casualties were
Old City Cemetery Marker area image. Click for full size.
By Bernard Fisher, May 26, 2014
3. Old City Cemetery Marker area
shipped home to families or to other cemeteries.

John Jay Terrell (1829-1922), the Quaker Doctor, played key roles in both fighting smallpox in the hospitals and in fighting the glanders epidemic among horses and mules in the quartermaster’s stables.

Horses and mules were the essential vehicles of the American Civil War. Lynchburg was the depot for distribution of cavalry horses supplying the Army of Northern Virginia.

On the right is a map of the cemetery pointing out three locations with interpretive comments:
1. The Confederate Section is the burial ground for 2201 Confederate soldiers from 14 states. 187 Union soldiers were also buried here but were removed by government order in 1866 to a Federal cemetery near Norfolk. There are also 11 burials in Negro Row within this Section.

2. The Pest House Medical Museum recreates medical conditions in the wretched house of pestilence, a smallpox quarantine hospital at the time of the Civil War. Also recreated is the late 1800s office of local medical hero, Dr. John Jay Terrell.

3. Site of the Quartermaster’s Glanders Stable where early medical research was conducted on Confederate cavalry horses. The result of the important pathological examination by Drs. Terrell and Page was published in 1864 and was called the first important American contribution to veterinary medicine.
 
Regarding Old City Cemetery.
Confederate Section of Lynchburg's Old City Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
4. Confederate Section of Lynchburg's Old City Cemetery
This is one in a series of Civil War Trails markers interpreting the Battle of Lynchburg (17-18 June 1864) and the city's role in the Civil War. Select the Civil War Virtual Tour by Marker link below to see other related markers.
 
Also see . . .
1. Civil War Lynchburg Virtual Tour by Markers. An eight stop Civil War Trails tour, with several Virginia state markers and other memorials added. (Submitted on December 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

2. Old City Cemetery. The Oldest Public Cemetery in Virginia Still in Use Today - Central Virginia's Most Unique Public Garden (Submitted on May 27, 2014.) 
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesScience & MedicineWar, US Civil
 
Mass Confederate grave. image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
5. Mass Confederate grave.
Grave marker indicates the 14 states of the dead.
Smallpox monument in Confederate Section of Old City Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 26, 2007
6. Smallpox monument in Confederate Section of Old City Cemetery
In memory of the Confederate soldiers who died of smallpox in the hospitals of Lynchburg during the war between the states.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 2,924 times since then and 28 times this year. Last updated on , by Jonathan Carruthers of Bealeton, Virginia. Photos:   1. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   2. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey.   3. submitted on , by Bernard Fisher of Mechanicsville, Virginia.   4, 5, 6. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. • Craig Swain was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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