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Manassas, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Mayfield Civil War Fort

The Changing Fortunes of War

 

—The Manassas Museum System —

 
Mayfield Civil War Fort Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
1. Mayfield Civil War Fort Marker
Inscription. After the First Battle of Manassas on June 21, 1861, Confederate forces continued to hold Manassas Junction until March 1862. They evacuated Manassas and moved south in order to counter Union Gen. George B. McClellan’s plans to attack Richmond. During this period, Union forces occupied the abandoned Confederate earthworks.

Manassas Junction became an important supply base for the Federals. On August 26, 1862, Confederate Gen. Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson’s troops briefly recaptured the junction, which they looted and burned. When a small Union force advanced on the junction the next day and was repulsed, the Mayfield fort may have seen action.

Despite another Confederate victory at the Second Battle of Manassas (August 28-30, 1862), Union forces held Manassas Junction for the rest of the war. The earthworks built to oppose an army of invasion now served as a base for an army of occupation.
 
Erected by Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 45.2′ N, 77° 27.197′ W. Marker is in Manassas, Virginia. Marker can be reached from the intersection of Battery Heights Boulevard and Quarry Road
Overlooking the Fort image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, September 2, 2007
2. Overlooking the Fort
Marker is in the foreground, closest to the camera.
, on the left when traveling south. Click for map. Located just south of the main fortification earthworks, on the left fork of the trail. Marker is in this post office area: Manassas VA 20110, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. A different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (about 500 feet away); a different marker also named Mayfield Civil War Fort (about 600 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Manassas.
 
More about this marker. On the left is a photograph of the destruction left after Jackson’s occupation, “This photograph is believed to have been taken shortly after Stonewall Jackson's August 1862 raid on Manassas Juction and shows the destruction wrought by his troops. The Union soldiers are posing beside burned Orange & Alexandria Railroad rolling stock.”

On the right a painting carries the caption, “A soldiers artist’s rendering of the area of Manassas Junction. The artist was Private Robert K. Sneden, who, in nearly two years, produced hundreds of paintings while campaigning with the Union Army.”
 
Related markers. Click here for a list of markers that are related to this marker. To better understand the relationship, study each marker in the order shown.
 
Also see . . .
1. Mayfield Civil War Fort. (Submitted on September 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. Jackson’s Raid on Manassas Junction. Discusses Jackson’s march to Manassas and includes another photograph of the damage at Manassas Junction. (Submitted on September 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Following in Jacksons’ Footsteps. A driving tour of Jackson’s march, by Tom Kelley (Submitted on September 8, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 1,397 times since then and 34 times this year. Last updated on , by Jonathan Carruthers of Bealeton, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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