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Trenton in Mercer County, New Jersey — The American Northeast (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Warren Street Plaza

 
 
Warren Street Plaza Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
1. Warren Street Plaza Marker
Inscription.
Warren Street Plaza
Dedicated 2004
-Mayor-
Honorable Douglas H. Palmer
-City Council-
Paul M. Pintella, President
Annette H. Lartigue, Vice President
Milford Bethea
Gino A. Melone
Manuel Segura
Cordelia M. Staton
John G. Ungrady
-Landscape Architect-
Randall R. Baum

 
Erected 2004.
 
Location. 40° 13.281′ N, 74° 45.962′ W. Marker is in Trenton, New Jersey, in Mercer County. Marker is at the intersection of North Warren Street and West Hanover Street, on the left when traveling north on North Warren Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Trenton NJ 08608, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. First Synagogue (about 300 feet away, measured in a direct line); Abraham Hunt House (about 300 feet away); First Professional Basketball Game (about 300 feet away); Route Taken by Washington (about 300 feet away); Government House (about 300 feet away); John Fitch’s Gun Shop (about 400 feet away); Fitch’s Shop (about 400 feet away); The Signing of the Ratification of the Constitution (about 400 feet away). Click for a list of all markers in Trenton.
 
More about this marker.
Warren Street Plaza Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
2. Warren Street Plaza Marker
This is a series of 15 markers in a large inlay map of the City of Trenton. Each of these markers call out a building of historical interest in the nearby area.

Below you will find pictures of each individual plaque on this map. Where an HMdb Marker page exists for that building, a link is provided to that marker to better assist you in learning its role in Trenton history. Selecting the "Click for map" link will show the location of each of these markers.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches, Etc.Colonial EraNotable BuildingsNotable EventsNotable PersonsWar, US Revolutionary
 
View of plaza from above. image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, December 2007
3. View of plaza from above.
Warren Street Plaza - New Jersey State Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
4. Warren Street Plaza - New Jersey State Museum Marker
Founded in 1897, the State Museum collects, preserves, interprets and exhibits over a wide range of subjects – from fossils to fine art, native American tools to the finest silver, quilts to comets and prehistory to the future. A planetarium and auditorium round out the museum complex.
Warren Street Plaza - New Jersey State House Marker image. Click for more information.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
5. Warren Street Plaza - New Jersey State House Marker
The State House is the heart of New Jersey’s state government, America’s second oldest state capitol building in continuous use. President-Elect Lincoln addressed the Legislature on his way to take office and Woodrow Wilson began the political career that would take him to the White House.
Click for more information.
Warren Street Plaza - Old Barracks Marker image. Click for more information.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
6. Warren Street Plaza - Old Barracks Marker
Built for British troops in the French and Indian Wars, the Barracks housed Hessians and Loyalists when Washington attacked Trenton Dec. 26, 1776. Later, it fell into private hands . Patriotic women bought one wing in 1902. In 1914, the State bought the other half and restored the site as a museum.
Click for more information.
Warren Street Plaza - Old Masonic Lodge Marker image. Click for more information.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
7. Warren Street Plaza - Old Masonic Lodge Marker
This is the first Masonic lodge building in Trenton, the fifth in New Jersey. Built on the corner of Front Street, it was moved across the block to this site in 1915, to become the gateway to Stacy Park. Home to the Trenton Visitors Center, the building houses the original lodge room.
Click for more information.
Warren Street Plaza - War Memorial Marker image. Click for more information.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
8. Warren Street Plaza - War Memorial Marker
Designed as a town hall, this was a practical monument to the soldiers and sailors of Mercer County who died in World War I. An outdoor court of honor leads inside to a grand auditorium and ballroom. Architect Louis Kaplan’s Art Deco interior was restored by the State in 1998, to audience acclaim.
Click for more information.
Warren Street Plaza - First Presbyterian Church Marker image. Click for more information.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
9. Warren Street Plaza - First Presbyterian Church Marker
This is the third First Church, the previous two (1726 & 1804) having been built elsewhere on the lot. The burial yards flanking the church include a masss grave of Hessians killed in the first Battle of Trenton, and the grave of Col. Rall, their leader. All lie on the church’s west side.
Click for more information.
Warren Street Plaza - Trenton Public Library Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
10. Warren Street Plaza - Trenton Public Library Marker
The Trenton Library Company was founded in 1750 by Dr. Thomas Cadwalader, the city’s chief burgess. It and other lending libraries came and went, until an April, 1900 referendum for a free public library was approved by a 3-to-1 margin. The building opened to the public in 1902.
Warren Street Plaza - St. Michael’s Episcopal Church Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
11. Warren Street Plaza - St. Michael’s Episcopal Church Marker
Originally known as the English Church, St. Michael’s closed for seven years during the Revolution. The church was largely rebuilt in 1819. David Brearley, a signer of the Constitution, state chief justice, and Washington’s appointee as New Jersey’s first federal judge, is buried here.
Warren Street Plaza - Trenton Fire Museum Marker image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
12. Warren Street Plaza - Trenton Fire Museum Marker
Volunteers fought Trenton’s fires from 1747 until April 4, 1892, when a paid department replaced 13 volunteer companies. The museum collects, interprets and preserves artifacts of firefighting in Trenton; collects and preserves oral histories of firefighters, and teaches fire safety.
Warren Street Plaza - Trenton Battle Monument Marker image. Click for more information.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
13. Warren Street Plaza - Trenton Battle Monument Marker
From this site, two batteries of Washington’s Continental artillery raked cannon fire down King (now Warren) and Queen (now Broad) streets, on the morning of Dec. 26, 1776. The monument to the victory at the first Battle of Trenton was erected through public subscription in 1893.
Click for more information.
Warren Street Plaza - Friends Meeting House Marker image. Click for more information.
By Gary Nigh, November 2007
14. Warren Street Plaza - Friends Meeting House Marker
The British occupied this site in December, 1776. Buried in its small graveyard are Revolutionary War figures, including George Clymer and General Philemon Dickinson. Clymer, a Pennsylvanian who helped finance the Continental Army, signed the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution.
Click for more information.
City Hall 1911 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, December 2007
15. City Hall 1911
Trenton entered the 20th century an industrial power. The white marble building designed to symbolize that status overlooked the Delaware & Raritan Canal (later replaced by Rt. 1). The Everett Shinn murals in the City Council Chamber show workers at the city’s potteries and wire rope mills.
Alexander Douglass House 1766 image. Click for more information.
By Gary Nigh, December 2007
16. Alexander Douglass House 1766
Built on South Broad Street, this small frame house was owned during the Revolution by Douglass, a quartermaster in the N.J. Militia. On the night of Jan. 2, 1777, following the second Battle of Trenton, Washington and his generals met in the house to plan a clandestine march to Princeton.
Click for more information.
Higbee Street School 1857 image. Click for full size.
By Gary Nigh, December 2007
17. Higbee Street School 1857
A free public school system was organized here in 1832, with separate schools for males, females; and African-Americans. A generation later, this was the first school built for African-American students. Of the 700 African-Americans in Trenton’s 1857 population of 18,000, 63 were of school age.
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 1,042 times since then and 13 times this year. Last updated on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14. submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey.   15, 16, 17. submitted on , by Gary Nigh of Trenton, New Jersey. • Kevin W. was the editor who published this page. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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