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Warrenton in Fauquier County, Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Warrenton

Home of the “Gray Ghost.”

 
 
Warrenton Marker image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 15, 2007
1. Warrenton Marker
Inscription. Although Warrenton was spared the ravages of major battles during the war, control of the town changed hands 67 times and many homes and churches housed soldiers or were used as hospitals. Warrenton was the home of several notable Confederates including Col. John Singleton Mosby, the “gray ghost of the Confederacy.” He is honored by the statue at this site. The Old Jail in use during the war, includes a Mosby exhibit.

Other Points of Interest:

1. The Warren Green Hotel (rebuilt after a fire in 1876) where Gen. George B. McClellan bade farewell to his troops on Nov. 16, 1862, when he was relieved of his command.

2. The “California Building,” built by William “Extra Billy” Smith, twice governor of Virginia and a general in the Civil War, from profits made in the California Gold Rush. Mosby practiced law here after the war.

3. 118 Culpeper St., the home of Capt. John Quincy Marr of the Warrenton Rifles Co., the first Confederate officer killed in the war. He died on June 1, 1861, at Fairfax Court House and is buried in the Warrenton Cemetery.

4. The Warrenton Cemetery, where Mosby is buried near a monument to 600 Confederate unknown soldiers. A map on the caretaker’s cottage identifies the location of all Confederate
Close up of the Marker Map image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 15, 2007
2. Close up of the Marker Map
North seeking arrow added by submitter
graves.

5. 67 Waterloo St., the home of Gen. Eppa Hunton, who was captured at Sailor’s Creek and imprisoned at Fort Warren. Following the war he served as a U.S. Congressman and Senator.

6. The Presbyterian Church at 4th and Main Streets shows the outline of bricks used to repair an opening cut to accommodate wagons when Federal troops used the ground floor as a stable and the upstairs sanctuary as a hospital.

7. 173 Main St. was Mosby’s home following the war.

8. The railroad depot, now a rails-to-trails park, was a hub of activity during the war and the site of an attempt on Mosby’s life following the war when he fell into disfavor for befriending Ulysses S. Grant.

9. The Warrenton-Fauquier County Visitors Center, open seven days a week, year-round, has Civil War Trails maps and additional historic material.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 38° 42.826′ N, 77° 47.755′ W. Marker is in Warrenton, Virginia, in Fauquier County. Marker is at the intersection of Waterloo Street (Business U.S. 211) and Ashby Street, on the left when traveling west on Waterloo Street. Click for map. The marker is in a courtyard between the Fauquier
The Civil War Trails Marker between the Court House and Old Jail image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 16, 2007
3. The Civil War Trails Marker between the Court House and Old Jail
The Mosby memorial is an obelisk to the right of the marker.
County Courthouse and the Old Jail. Next to the marker are several memorials to include one honoring Mosby, Gulf War Veterans, and a Visit by Lafayette. Marker is in this post office area: Warrenton VA 20188, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. John Singleton Mosby (here, next to this marker); Lafayette’s Stepping Stone (here, next to this marker); Executions in the Yard (within shouting distance of this marker); a different marker also named Warrenton (within shouting distance of this marker); Norris Tavern / The Warren Green (within shouting distance of this marker); Brentmoor: The Spilman-Mosby House (approx. 0.3 miles away); Brentmoor (approx. 0.3 miles away); Black Horse Cavalry (approx. 0.7 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Warrenton.
 
More about this marker. The marker has a photo, courtesy of Fort Ward Museum, showing wartime Warrenton, with the caption, “This photo was taken in August 1862, near where you are now standing. The Court House in the photo was destroyed by fire in 1889 and replaced with the current structure, a nearly identical replica. The brick building on the left (15 Main St.) and several other buildings still stand.

The marker also features a small picture of Col.
Confederate Monument in Warrenton Cemetery image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 16, 2007
4. Confederate Monument in Warrenton Cemetery
Mosby.
 
Also see . . .
1. The Mosby House at 173 Main Street. (Submitted on June 24, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.)
2. Warren-Green Hotel. Pictures of the Warren-Green Hotel and California Building are related to this marker. (Submitted on June 24, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 

3. Captain John Quincy Marr. Captain Marr's death is detailed on a marker in Fairfax County. (Submitted on June 24, 2007, by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia.) 
 
Additional keywords. Mosby's Confederacy
 
Categories. War, US Civil
 
Marr House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 15, 2007
5. Marr House
Built in 1830 by the father of Captain John Quincy Marr. Also birthplace of Fanny Harrison Marr, poet.
Warrenton Railroad Depot image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 15, 2007
6. Warrenton Railroad Depot
A caboose is sited next to the old Warrenton Depot.
Eppa Hunton House image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 16, 2007
7. Eppa Hunton House
Built in 1838,is now a restaurant.
Warrenton Presbyterian Church image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 15, 2007
8. Warrenton Presbyterian Church
The bricks around the doorway are slightly different color and context than the others, as noted in the marker text.
Mosby Memorial image. Click for full size.
By Craig Swain, June 15, 2007
9. Mosby Memorial
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page has been viewed 2,098 times since then and 30 times this year. Last updated on , by Jonathan Carruthers of Bealeton, Virginia. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Craig Swain of Leesburg, Virginia. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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