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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Savage in Scott County, Minnesota — The American Midwest (Upper Plains)
 

Camp Savage

 
 
Camp Savage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, April 30, 2011
1. Camp Savage Marker
Inscription. During World War II, some 5,000-6,000 Japanese American soldiers, members of the U.S. Army's Military Intelligence Service, were given intensive and accelerated classes in the Japanese language at Camp Savage.

Their subsequent work translating captured documents, maps, battle plans, diaries, letters, and printed materials and interrogating Japanese prisoners made them "Our human secret weapons," according to President Harry Truman, who commended them following the war.

The Military Intelligence Service (MIS) program began in the fall of 1941, a few weeks before Pearl Harbor, at the Presidio in San Francisco.

For security reasons it was moved in May, 1942 to Camp Savage, a site personally selected by language school commandant Colonel Kai E. Rasmussen, who believed Savage was "a community that would accept Japanese Americans for their true worth – American soldiers fighting with their brains for their native America."

The 132-acre site had served as a Civilian Conservation Corps camp in the 1930s and was later used to house elderly indigent men.

Conditions there were extremely difficult in the early months of the war, when the first students studied without desks, chairs, or even beds. By August, 1944 the program had outgrown Camp Savage and was moved to larger facilities at
Camp Savage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, April 30, 2011
2. Camp Savage Marker
Fort Snelling.

Most of the English-speaking Japanese Americans, known as Nisei, were from the West Coast area. Some were already in the U.S. military service when they were selected for the language school, while others were volunteers from the camps in which American citizens of Japanese ancestry had been interned following the bombing of Pearl Harbor.

According to General Charles Willoughby, chief of intelligence for General Douglas MacArthur, "the 6,000 Nisei shortened the Pacific war by two years."

Erected by the
Savage Chamber of Commerce
1993

 
Erected 1993 by the Savage Chamber of Commerce.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Civilian Conservation Corps marker series.
 
Location. 44° 46.707′ N, 93° 21.116′ W. Marker is in Savage, Minnesota, in Scott County. Marker is at the intersection of Xenwood Avenue and South Frontage Road, on the left when traveling south on Xenwood Avenue. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Savage MN 55378, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Bloomington Town Hall (approx. 3.5 miles away); Fallen Heroes Memorial
Camp Savage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, April 30, 2011
3. Camp Savage Marker
(approx. 3.7 miles away); Civil War Monument (approx. 4 miles away); Samuel W. and Gideon H. Pond (approx. 4.6 miles away); Shakopee Soldiers Monument (approx. 7.3 miles away); Richfield Pioneer Homestead (approx. 7.5 miles away); Rodney J. Putz (approx. 7.6 miles away); Pond Mission (approx. 7.6 miles away).
 
Also see . . .
1. World War II Camp Savage. City of Savage, Minnesota website. (Submitted on April 13, 2011.) 

2. Camp Savage. Wikipedia entry. (Submitted on April 13, 2011.) 

3. Camp Savage. Photos of the students. (Submitted on April 13, 2011.) 
 
Categories. War, World II
 
Camp Savage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, April 30, 2011
4. Camp Savage Marker
Camp Savage Marker image. Click for full size.
By Keith L, April 30, 2011
5. Camp Savage Marker
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page has been viewed 1,169 times since then and 11 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5. submitted on , by Keith L of Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin. This page was last revised on June 21, 2016.
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