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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Charles Town in Jefferson County, West Virginia — The American South (Mid-Atlantic)
 

Zion Episcopal Churchyard

Notable Occupants

 
 
Zion Episcopal Churchyard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2011
1. Zion Episcopal Churchyard Marker
Inscription.
The present church, the fourth on this site, was completed in 1851. Federal troops occupied it during the Civil War and severely damaged it.

The churchyard contains the graves of many Washington family descents. They are buried near the eastern edge of the church. Several other notable Charles Town residents are buried here as well.

George W. Turner attended the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, 1827-1831 (Robert E. Lee attended 1825-1829). Turner served in the U.S. Army until he resigned in 1836 and returned home to Charles Town. John Brown’s men shot him on the streets of Harpers Ferry on October 17, 1859: one of four civilians killed. His grave is on the west side of the church toward the south wall.

John Yates Beall was a Charles Town resident who served in Co. G, 2nd Virginia Infantry, until he was wounded and discharged. He then sought to serve as a privateer on the Great Lakes. Eventually, he tried and failed to commandeer a train near Niagara, New York, to free captured Confederate officers on board. He was captured, tried, and convicted of espionage. He was hanged on February 25, 1865. His grave is in the northeastern corner of the cemetery. Beall allegedly was a friend of John Wilkes Booth.

Col. R. Preston Chew led Confederate Gen. J.E.B. Stuart’s Horse Artillery. After the war, he started
Marker in Zion Episcopal Churchyard image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2011
2. Marker in Zion Episcopal Churchyard
the Charelstown Mining, Manufacturing, and Improvement Company in present-day Ranson, West Virginia.
 
Erected by West Virginia Civil War Trails.
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the West Virginia Civil War Trails marker series.
 
Location. 39° 17.359′ N, 77° 51.359′ W. Marker is in Charles Town, West Virginia, in Jefferson County. Marker is at the intersection of E Congress Street and S Church Street, on the right when traveling east on E Congress Street. Click for map. Marker is in this post office area: Charles Town WV 25414, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. The Stribling House (about 500 feet away, measured in a direct line); Rutherford House (about 500 feet away); Focus of Action (about 500 feet away); Edge Hill Cemetery (about 500 feet away); John Yates (approx. 0.2 miles away); Confederate Soldiers of Jefferson County (approx. 0.2 miles away); Jefferson County Courthouse (approx. 0.2 miles away); Jefferson County World War II Memorial (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Charles Town.
 
More about this marker. Portraits of John Yates Peall (Courtesy West Virginia State Archives) and Col. R. Preston Chew (Courtesy Virginia Military
Zion Episcopal Churchyard Marker image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2011
3. Zion Episcopal Churchyard Marker
Institute) appear on the left side of the marker. The lower center of he marker features a picture of “Chew’s Battery in action, from William N. McDonald, A History of the Laurel Brigade (1907).” The lower right of the marker contains a map which highlights significant Civil War Sites in Jefferson County, WV, many of which are interpreted by Civil War Trail signage.
 
Categories. Cemeteries & Burial SitesChurches, Etc.War, US Civil
 
Graves in Zion Episcopal Churchyard image. Click for full size.
By Bill Coughlin, April 12, 2011
4. Graves in Zion Episcopal Churchyard
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page has been viewed 677 times since then and 32 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4. submitted on , by Bill Coughlin of North Arlington, New Jersey. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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