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“Bite-Size Bits of Local, National, and Global History”
Ridgeville in Dorchester County, South Carolina — The American South (South Atlantic)
 

Cypress Methodist Camp Ground

 
 
Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, 2011
1. Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Marker
Inscription. (Front text)
This camp ground, dating to 1794, is one of the oldest in S.C. Francis Asbury (1745-1816), circuit rider and the first Methodist bishop in America, preached here in 1794, 1799, 1801, and twice in 1803. The camp ground is supported by five local communities: Givhans, Lebanon, New Hope, Ridgeville, and Zion.
(Reverse text)
“Tents,” or rough-hewn cabins, form a rectangle around the “tabernacle,” the open-sided shelter where services are held. The cemetery nearby includes graves as early as 1821. This camp ground, in session the week ending the fourth Sunday in October, was listed in the National Register of Historic Places in 1978.
 
Erected 2009 by The Upper Dorchester County Historical Society. (Marker Number 18-14.)
 
Marker series. This marker is included in the Francis Asbury, Traveling Methodist Preacher marker series.
 
Location. 33° 6.204′ N, 80° 16.397′ W. Marker is in Ridgeville, South Carolina, in Dorchester County. Marker is on Cypress Campground Road near Myers Mayo Road (South Carolina Highway 18-182). Click for map. Located at the Center of the Campground, between U.S. Hwy. 78 and I-26. Marker is in this post office area: Ridgeville SC 29472, United States of America.
 
Other nearby markers.
Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Marker, reverse side image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 10, 2011
2. Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Marker, reverse side
National Register of Historic Places: Cypress Methodist Camp Ground ** (added 1978 - - #78002504)
Historic Significance: Architecture/Engineering, Person Architect, builder, or engineer: Unknown Architectural Style: No Style Listed Historic Person: Ashbury,Francis Area of Significance: Architecture, Religion Period of Significance: 1900-1924, 1875-1899, 1850-1874, 1825-1849, 1800-1824
At least 8 other markers are within 8 miles of this marker, measured as the crow flies. Ridgeville (approx. 2.5 miles away); Berkeley County (approx. 3.1 miles away); Moorefield Memorial Highway, (Southern Terminus) (approx. 5.2 miles away); Revolutionary War Cannon (approx. 5.3 miles away); Four Holes Swamp (approx. 5.3 miles away); Four Holes Swamp Bridge / Harley's Tavern (approx. 5.3 miles away); Wassamassaw (approx. 7 miles away); Dorchester (approx. 7.5 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Ridgeville.
 
Regarding Cypress Methodist Camp Ground. Cypress Methodist Camp Ground is one of only a few campgrounds in South Carolina which, up until the time of its nomination, continues to host annual week-long camp meetings—a vestige of the Great Awakening in American religious life in the nineteenth century. Cypress is significant for its association with Francis Asbury, pioneer of American Methodism, and for its long, uninterrupted use as a site of revivalism for almost 200 years. The campground is in the general shape of a rectangle of 34 tents, or cabins, made of rough-hewn lumber. These cabins, rectangular shaped, are generally 1½ stories and contain earthen floors. The typical floor plan features a hall extending the length of the cabin with as many as three rooms on the opposite side. The second story is accessible by a small
Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Marker with the “tabernacle,” the open-sided shelter image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 10, 2011
3. Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Marker with the “tabernacle,” the open-sided shelter
stairway or ladder. In the center of the rectangle is the tabernacle, an open-sided wooden structure that is the focal point of these revival meetings. Serving crowds too large for church buildings or homes, the campground responded to both religious and social needs. The tents allowed people to stay overnight, and the campground term remained even though tents were gradually replaced by the current rough-hewn cabins. Cypress Camp Ground was functional as early as 1794, and an adjacent cemetery contains graves from the early 1800s. Listed in the National Register April 26, 1978.(South Carolina Department of Archives and History)
 
Categories. Churches, Etc.
 
Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Marker, located in the center of the campground image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 10, 2011
4. Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Marker, located in the center of the campground
tents were gradually replaced by the current rough-hewn cabins, seen in the background
Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Marker and the “tabernacle,” image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 10, 2011
5. Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Marker and the “tabernacle,”
Marker and adjacent Cypress United Methodist  Church image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 10, 2011
6. Marker and adjacent Cypress United Methodist Church
Cypress Methodist Camp Ground rough-hewn cabins image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 10, 2011
7. Cypress Methodist Camp Ground rough-hewn cabins
Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Marker image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 10, 2011
8. Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Marker
The campground is in the general shape of a rectangle of tents, or cabins, made of rough-hewn lumber.
Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Tabernacle image. Click for full size.
South Carolina Department of Archives and History., circa 1978
9. Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Tabernacle
Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Agenda from 2010 image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, April 10, 2011
10. Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Agenda from 2010
Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Pulpit, seen today image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 8, 2013
11. Cypress Methodist Camp Ground Pulpit, seen today
Cypress Methodist Church at the campground. within the rectangle image. Click for full size.
By Mike Stroud, September 8, 2013
12. Cypress Methodist Church at the campground. within the rectangle
 
 
Credits. This page originally submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page has been viewed 932 times since then and 20 times this year. Photos:   1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   10. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina.   11, 12. submitted on , by Mike Stroud of Bluffton, South Carolina. This page was last revised on June 16, 2016.
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